Chords Page

The CHORDS Page

Printable PDF Chord charts and diagrams for Guitar(standard, open G / Dobro and other tunings), Bass Guitar, 5 string Banjo[G, C(plectrum), double C and G modal tunings], Ukulele, Piano, Mandolin/GDAE tenor banjo, two string chords for fiddle(violin). Plus - advanced & movable guitar & mandolin chords, chord theory, playing hints and the Nashville Numbering system.

You may also be interested to check out our music education section which includes more info on chords & scales.




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THE CHORDS LISTS PROVIDED are probably far more than even the most "jazzy" player will ever use. Currently we have charts for: Guitar, 5 string Banjo (G tuning DGBD and C tuning CGBD), Piano, Ukulele (C tuning GCEA) and Mandolin (the mandolin chords should also work for GDAE tenor banjo) are provided. The fiddle (violin) chords are of course for two strings only, and only for the most commonly used keys in traditional music folk music.

If you were looking, not for chord charts for your instrument, but for CHORD SEQUENCE PLAYING CHARTS for common session songs and tunes look HERE and HERE

Notes:

Conventions used: Sharp and flat chords can often be expressed in two ways, e.g. C sharp (C#) could also be written as D flat (Db). The chord spellings I have used here are the ones I have found most commonly used in folk and traditional music circles in the UK.
Fiddle players may also care to check out the mandolin chords pages for chord ideas as standard fiddle and standard mandolin use the same tuning.

Printable Chord diagrams

Should you need a print-out of the chord charts, PDF versions (without banners or adverts) are available from the link at the bottom of each chord page.

Chords beginning Instrument type
notes: Banjo C tuninig is the same as standard plectrum banjo tuning (CGBD). There 4 pages per key for piano, see submenu on bass guitar pages for other bass chords.
A
guitar banjo C banjo mandolinbass Ukulele piano1 piano2 piano3 piano4 Fiddle
Bb/A#
guitar banjo C banjo mandolinbass Ukulele piano1 piano2 piano3 piano4 Fiddle
B
guitar banjo C banjo mandolinbass Ukulele piano1 piano2 piano3 piano4 Fiddle
C
guitar banjo C banjo mandolinbass Ukulele piano1 piano2 piano3 piano4 Fiddle
Db/C#
guitar banjo C banjo mandolinbass Ukulele piano1 piano2 piano3 piano4 .
D
guitar banjo C banjo mandolinbass Ukulele piano1 piano2 piano3 piano4 Fiddle
Eb/D#
guitar banjo C banjo mandolinbass Ukulele piano1 piano2 piano3 piano4 .
E
guitar banjo C banjo mandolinbass Ukulele piano1 piano2 piano3 piano4 .
F
guitar banjo C banjo mandolinbass Ukulele piano1 piano2 piano3 piano4 .
Gb/F#
guitar banjo C banjo mandolinbass Ukulele piano1 piano2 piano3 piano4 .
G
guitar banjo C banjo mandolinbass Ukulele piano1 piano2 piano3 piano4 Fiddle
Ab/G#
guitar banjo C banjo mandolinbass Ukulele piano1 piano2 piano3 piano4 -
Click the instrument type in the row for the chords you want to see. Notes: The chords are for standard tunings for guitar and mandolin and for the most commonly used G tuning for 5 string banjo. Minor chords us a small "m" major by a cap, e.g. Am7 = A minor 7th AM7= A major 7, Augmented and diminished chords are often represented by a + and - suffix e.g. A+ A-, however I have used the more explanatory "aug" and "dim".

Chords for Banjo and Guitar in special tunings
Banjo - Double C tuning (CGCD) A Bb B C C# D Eb E F F# G Ab
Banjo - G Modal tuning (DGCD) A Bb B C C# D Eb E F F# G Ab
Guitar - Open G / Dobro tuning A Bb B C C# D Eb E F F# G Ab
Guitar - D Modal or Celtic tuning(DADGAD)ABbBCC#DEbEFF#GAb
Guitar - Dropped D tuning(DADGBE)ABbBCC#DEbEFF#GAb
Notes: Banjo 5th string tuned to G,
Includes: major, minor, m6, m7, Maj7, 6th, 7th, 9th, diminished and augmented chords

Hints For Playing Chords

Rather than trying to learn tons of different chord shapes, it may make sense (for banjo and guitar anyway), to learn just a couple, and use a capo to get the other keys. This is certainly the common practice in the fields of traditional old-time and bluegrass music, where, most players learn the "C" and "G" shapes and use a capo for any other keys. The reasons for learning at least two shape sets, and not just one, is that with just one, you may find yourself having to move uncomfortably far up the neck for some keys, also some shapes may not provide easy access to the melody notes you need to play a particular song. Some masochists may claim use of a capo is "cheating", and indeed some types of music need so much "weirdness" in the way of chords that a capo would be a hindrance, but as this site is about traditional stuff we don't talk about that kind of music on these pages. My view, as you might guess, is why suffer unnecessarily - life is to short and there are too many tunes to learn!

Which Chords to use for which key

Each key has a set of chords which are the ones most commonly used for that key. Each of these chords corresponds to a step in the scale. These steps are traditionally numbered with Roman numerals (don't ask) . The first step "I" is the first note of the scale, for example playing in C the I is C, the II is D the III is E and so on. I have prepared a chart HERE which gives details of the chords for each key. These Roman numerals are also the basis of the "Nashville Notation" with which you may sometimes see a song notated, e.g. with I, IV, V etc instead of chord names. Examples of this in action will sometimes be seen in hastily formed scratch bands where one of the musicians who knows the song may be seen raising numbers of fingers behind his back, he is usually not being rude but trying to help out by signaling what is the next chord to be played. See Nashville Numbering System for a more detailed description.

Advanced and Movable Mandolin Chords.

Each of these charts contains several chord diagrams. Click the link to see the chart you are interested in.
Key
Movable
Advanced (with alterative chord positions up the neck)
A
A, Am, A+, A6 | A6, Am6, A7, Am7 | Am7, Am7b5. Adim, A7+, A7b5, Amaj7, A9#5 | A7b5b9, Am9
Bb/A#
B
Bmajor, Bm, B6 | B6, Bm7, B7, Bm7 | Bm7, Bm7b5, Bdim, B7+, B7b5 | Bmaj7, B7b5b9, Bm9, B9#5
C
C, Cm, C+, C6 | C6, Cm6, C7, Cm7
Cm7, Cm7b5, Cdim, C7b5, Cmaj7, C9#5 | C7b5b9, Cm9
Db/C#
C#major, C#m, C#+, C#6 | C#6, C#m6, C#7, C#m7
C#m7, C#m7b5, C#dim, C#7+, C#7b5, C#maj7, C#9#5 | C#7b5b9, C#m9
D
Dmajor, D+, Dm | D6, Dm6, D7 | Dm7, Dm7b5, Ddim
D7+, D7b5, Dmaj7, D7b5b9, Dm9, D9#5
Eb/D#
Ebmajor, Ebm, Eb+, Eb6 | Eb6, Ebm6, Eb7, Ebm7
Ebm7, Ebm7b5, Ebdim, Eb7+,Eb7b5, Ebmaj7, Ebm9 | Eb7b5b9, Eb9#5
E
E, Em, E6 | E6, Em6, E7, Em7 | Em7, Em7b5, E7+, Edim, Em9 | E7b5, Emaj7, E7b5b9, E9#5
F
F, Fm, F+, F6 | F6, Fm6, F7, Fm7 | Fm7, F7+, Fm7b5, Fdim, F7b5, Fmaj7 | F7b5b9, Fm9, F9#5
Gb/F#
F#major, F#m, F#+, F#6 | F#6, F#m6, F#7, F#maj7, F#m7
F#m7, F#m7b5, F#dim, F#7+, F#7b5, F#9#5 | F#7b5b9, F#m9
G
G, Gm, G+, G6 | G6, Gm6, G7, Gm7 | Gm7, Gm7b5, Gdim, G7+ | G7b5, Gmaj7, G7b5b9, Gm9, G9#5
Ab/G#



For chord books and charts to buy check the Chords Collection at Sheet Music Plus.


Advanced Guitar Chords.

Each of these charts contains 6-8 chord diagrams, click the link to see the chart you are interested in.

Advanced Guitar Chords Information & Conventions used in above pages.

An "x" above an unfretted string means it is not played. An "o" above an un fretted string means it can be played open.
A number to the left of the fretboard indicates where the chord is played.. The .'s and,'s after the chord name means that the chord is a duplicate or alternate formation.

Chord information: aug = #5 (Augmented triad), (no 3rd) = 5 (Root and 5th - Power chord), 6/7sus4 = 6/7sus (Sus4 triad plus 6th, minor 7th), dom7 = 7 (Major triad, minor 7th), 7/add11 = 7/11 (Minor triad, minor 7th, plus 11th)
2 = add9 (Major triad, plus 9th), sus = sus4 (No 3rd but a 4th from a major triad), #7 = maj7 (Major triad, major 7th) sus2 = add9(no 3rd) (No 3rd but a 2th from a major triad), 6/9 = 6/add9 (Major triad plus 6th and 9th)
9(#7) = maj9 (Major triad, major 9th plus 7th), o7 = m7(b5) (Diminished triad, minor 7th : half-diminshed
dom9 = 9 (Major triad, minor 7th plus 9th)

C/D is an C chord with a D bass note (xx0010) ., A/B is an A chord with a B bass note (x22220) ., G/D is an G chord with a D bass note (xx0003) . And so on.
If you are playing in a band with a bass player you don't need to play the with a bass note, just play it as a normal chord (eg. C/D = C and so on) .

ARE YOU A SINGER OR ACCOMPANIST? Have you seen our collection of 15,000 song lyrics with chords marked for guitar, ukulele, banjo or other chord playing instrument, full list HERE