The English And Scottish Popular Ballads

by FRANCIS JAMES CHILD.

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229A: Earl Crawford


229A.1	 O WE were sisters, sisters seven,
	 We were a comely crew to see,
	 And some got lairds, and some got lords,
	 And some got knichts o his degree;
	 And I mysel got the Earl o Crawford,
	 And wasna that a great match for me!
229A.2	 It was at fifteen that I was married,
	 And at sixteen I had a son;
	 And wasna that an age ower tender
	 For a lady to hae her first-born!
	 And wasna, etc.
229A.3	 But it fell ance upon a day
	 I gaed into the garden green,
	 And naebody was therein walking
	 But Earl Crawford and his young son.
229A.4	 'I wonder at you, ye Earl Crawford,
	 I wonder at you wi your young son;
	 Ye daut your young son mair than your Lillie;
	 [I'm sure you got na him your lane.']
229A.5	 [He turned about upon his heel,
	 I wite an angry man was he;
	 Says, If I got nae my young son my lane,
	 Bring me here the one that helpet me.]
229A.6	 ['O hold your tongue, my Earl Crawford,
	 And a' my folly lat it be;
	 There was nane at the gettin o oor son,
	 Nae body only but you and me.']
229A.7	 He set her on a milk-white steed,
	 Her little young son her before;
	 Says, Ye maun gae to bonny Stobha,
	 For ye will enter my yates no more.
229A.8	 When she cam to her father's bowers,
	 She lichtit low down on the stane,
	 And wha sae ready as her auld father
	 To welcome Lady Lillie in?
229A.9	 'O how's a' wi you, my daughter Lillie,
	 That ye come here sae hastilie?
	 And how's a' wi' the Earl o Crawford,
	 That he didna send a boy wi thee?'
229A.10	 'O haud your tongue now, my old father,
	 And ye'll lat a' your folly be;
	 For ae word that my merry mou spak
	 Has parted my good lord and me.'
229A.11	 'O haud your tongue, my daughter Lillie,
	 And a' your follies lat them be;
	 I'll double your portion ten times ower,
	 And a better match I'll get for thee.'
229A.12	 'O haud your tongue now, my old father,
	 And a' your folly lat it be;
	 I wouldna gie ae kiss o Crawford
	 For a' the goud that ye can gie.
229A.13	 'Whare will I get a bonny boy,
	 That's willin to win meat and fee,
	 Wha will gae on to Earl Crawford
	 An see an's heart be fawn to me?'
229A.14	 When he cam to the yates o Crawford,
	 They were a' sitting down to dine:
	 'How comes it now, ye Earl Crawford,
	 Ye arena takin Lady Lillie hame?'
229A.15	 'Ye may gae tell her Lady Lillie,
	 And ye maun neither lee nor len,
	 She may stay in her father's bowers,
	 For she'll not enter my yates again.'
229A.16	 When he cam back to her father's yates,
	 He lichtit low down on his knee:
	 'What news, what news, my bonny boy?
	 What news, what news hae ye to me?'
229A.17	 'I'm bidden tell you, Lady Lillie-+--+-
	 I'm bidden neither to lee nor len-+--+-
	 She may stay in her father's bowers,
	 For she'll not enter my yates again.'
229A.18	 She stretched out her lily hand,
	 Says, 'Adieu, adieu to ane and a!
	 Adieu, adieu to Earl Crawford!'
	 Wi that her sair heart brak in twa.
229A.19	 Then dowie, dowie her father raise up,
	 And dowie, dowie the black put on,
	 And dowie, dowie he mounted the brown,
	 And dowie, dowie sat thereon.
229A.20	 And dowie rade to the yates o Crawford,
	 And when to Crawford's yates he came,
	 They were a' dressd in the robes o scarlet,
	 Just gaun to tak Lady Lillie hame.
229A.21	 'Ye may cast aff your robes o scarlet-+--+-
	 I wyte they set you wondrous weel-+--+-
	 And now put on the black sae dowie,
	 And come and bury your Lady Lill.'
229A.22	 He took his hat into his hand,
	 And laid it low down by his knee:
	 'An it be true that Lillie's dead,
	 The sun shall nae mair shine on me.'

229B: Earl Crawford


229B.1	 O WE were seven bonny sisters,
	 As fair women as fair could be,
	 And some got lairds, and some got lords,
	 And some got knights o high degree:
	 When I was married to Earl Crawford,
	 This was the fate befell to me.
229B.2	 When we had been married for some time,
	 We walked in our garden green,
	 And aye he clappd his young son's head,
	 And aye he made sae much o him.
229B.3	 I turnd me right and round about,
	 And aye the blythe blink in my ee:
	 'Ye think as much o your young son
	 As ye do o my fair body.
229B.4	 'What need ye clap your young son's head?
	 What need ye make so much o him?
	 What need ye clap your young son's head?
	 I'm sure ye gotna him your lane.'
229B.5	 'O if I gotna him my lane,
	 Show here the man that help d me;
	 And for these words your ain mouth spoke
	 Heir o my land he neer shall be.'
229B.6	 He calld upon his stable-groom
	 To come to him right speedilie:
	 'Gae saddle a steed to Lady Crawford,
	 Be sure ye do it hastilie.
229B.7	 'His bridle gilt wi gude red gowd,
	 That it may glitter in her ee;
	 And send her on to bonny Stobha,
	 All her relations for to see.'
229B.8	 Her mother lay oer the castle wa,
	 And she beheld baith dale and down,
	 And she beheld her Lady Crawford,
	 As she came riding to the town.
229B.9	 'Come here, come here, my husband dear,
	 This day ye see not what I see;
	 For here there comes her Lady Crawford,
	 Riding alane upon the lee.'
229B.10	 When she came to her father's yates,
	 She tirled gently at the pin:
	 'If ye sleep, awake, my mother dear,
	 Ye'll rise lat Lady Crawford in.'
229B.11	 'What news, what news, ye Lady Crawford,
	 That ye come here so hastilie?'
	 'Bad news, bad news, my mother dear,
	 For my gude lord's forsaken me.'
229B.12	 'O wae's me for you, Lady Crawford,
	 This is a dowie tale to me;
	 Alas! you were too young married
	 To thole sic cross and misery.'
229B.13	 'O had your tongue, my mother dear,
	 And ye'll lat a' your folly be;
	 It was a word my merry mouth spake
	 That sinderd my gude lord and me.'
229B.14	 Out it spake her brither then,
	 Aye as he stept ben the floor:
	 'My sister Lillie was but eighteen years
	 When Earl Crawford ca'ed her a whore.
229B.15	 'But had your tongue, my sister dear,
	 And ye'll lat a' your mourning bee;
	 I'll wed you to as fine a knight,
	 That is nine times as rich as hee.'
229B.16	 'O had your tongue, my brither dear,
	 And ye'll lat a' your folly bee;
	 I'd rather yae kiss o Crawford's mouth
	 Than a' his gowd and white monie.
229B.17	 'But saddle to me my riding-steed,
	 And see him saddled speedilie,
	 And I will on to Earl Crawford's,
	 And see if he will pity me.'
229B.18	 Earl Crawford lay o'er castle wa,
	 And he beheld baith dale and down,
	 And he beheld her lady Crawford,
	 As she came riding to the town.
229B.19	 He called ane o his livery men
	 To come to him right speedilie:
	 'Gae shut my yates, gae steek my doors,
	 Keep Lady Crawford out frae me.'
229B.20	 When she came to Earl Crawford's yates,
	 She tirled gently at the pin:
	 'O sleep ye, wake ye, Earl Crawford,
	 Ye'll open, lat Lady Crawford in.
229B.21	 'Come down, come down, O Earl Crawford,
	 And speak some comfort unto me;
	 And if ye winna come yoursell,
	 Ye'll send your gentleman to me.'
229B.22	 'Indeed I winna come mysell,
	 Nor send my gentleman to thee;
	 For I tauld you when we did part
	 Nae mair my spouse ye'd ever bee.'
229B.23	 She laid her mouth then to the yates,
	 And aye the tears drapt frae her ee;
	 Says, Fare ye well, Earl Crawford's yates,
	 You again I'll nae mair see.
229B.24	 Earl Crawford calld on his stable-groom
	 To come to him right speedilie,
	 And sae did he his waiting-man,
	 That did attend his fair bodie.
229B.25	 'Ye will gae saddle for me my steed,
	 And see and saddle him speedilie,
	 And I'll gang to the Lady Crawford,
	 And see if she will pity me.'
229B.26	 Lady Crawford lay oer castle-wa,
	 And she beheld baith dale and down,
	 And she beheld him Earl Crawford,
	 As he came riding to the town.
229B.27	 Then she has calld ane o her maids
	 To come to her right speedilie:
	 'Gae shut my yates, gae steek my doors,
	 Keep Earl Crawford out frae me.'
229B.28	 When he came to Lady Crawford's yates,
	 He tirled gently at the pin:
	 'Sleep ye, wake ye, Lady Crawford,
	 Ye'll rise and lat Earl Crawford in.
229B.29	 'Come down, come down, O Lady Crawford,
	 Come down, come down, and speak wi me;
	 And gin ye winna come yoursell,
	 Ye'll send your waiting-maid to me.'
229B.30	 'Indeed I winna come mysell,
	 Nor send my waiting-maid to thee;
	 Sae take your ain words hame again
	 At Crawford castle ye tauld me.
229B.31	 'O mother dear, gae make my bed,
	 And ye will make it saft and soun,
	 And turn my face unto the west,
	 That I nae mair may see the sun.'
229B.32	 Her mother she did make her bed,
	 And she did make it saft and soun;
	 True were the words fair Lillie spake,
	 Her lovely eyes neer saw the sun.
229B.33	 The Earl Crawford mounted his steed,
	 Wi sorrows great he did ride hame;
	 But ere the morning sun appeard
	 This fine lord was dead and gane.
229B.34	 Then on ae night this couple died,
	 And baith were buried in ae tomb:
	 Let this a warning be to all,
	 Their pride may not bring them low down.

Next: 230. The Slaughter of the Laird of Mellerstain






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