The English And Scottish Popular Ballads

by FRANCIS JAMES CHILD.

Home Main Menu Singing & Playing Order & Order Info Support Search Voucher Codes



Share page  Visit Us On FB

Index  Previous  Next 

228A: Glasgow Peggie


228A.1	 'AS I cam in by Glasgow town,
	 The Highland troops were a' before me,
	 And the bonniest lass that eer I saw,
	 She lives in Glasgow, they ca her Peggie.
228A.2	 'I wad gie my bonnie black horse,
	 So wad I my gude grey naigie,
	 If I were twa hundred miles in the north,
	 And nane wi me but my bonnie Peggie.'
228A.3	 Up then spak her father dear,
	 Dear wow! but he was wondrous sorrie;
	 'Weel may ye steal a cow or a yowe,
	 But ye dare nae steal my bonnie Peggie.'
228A.4	 Up then spak her mother dear,
	 Dear wow! but she spak wondrous sorrie;
	 Now since I have brought ye up this length,
	 Wad ye gang awa wi a Highland fellow?'
228A.5	 He set her on his bonnie black horse,
	 He set himsel on his gude grey naigie,
	 And they have ridden oer hills and dales,
	 And he's awa wi his bonnie Peggie.
228A.6	 They have ridden oer hills and dales,
	 They have ridden oer mountains many,
	 Until they cam to a low, low glen,
	 And there he's lain down wi his bonnie Peggie.
228A.7	 Up then spak the Earl of Argyle,
	 Dear wow! but he spak wondrous sorrie;
	 'The bonniest lass in a' Scotland
	 Is off and awa wi a Highland fellow!'
228A.8	 Their bed was of the bonnie green grass,
	 Their blankets war o the hay sae bonnie;
	 He folded his philabeg below her head,
	 And he's lain down wi his bonnie Peggie.
228A.9	 Up then spak the bonny Lowland lass,
	 And wow! but she spak wondrous sorrie;
	 'I'se warrant my mither wad hae a gay sair heart
	 To see me lien here wi you, my Willie.'
228A.10	 'In my father's house there's feather-beds,
	 Feather-beds, and blankets mony;
	 They're a' mine, and they'll sune be thine,
	 And what needs your mither be sae sorrie, Peggie?
228A.11	 'Dinna you see yon nine score o kye,
	 Feeding on yon hill sae bonnie?
	 They're a' mine, and they'll sune be thine,
	 And what needs your mither be sorrie, Peggie?
228A.12	 'Dinna you see yon nine score o sheep,
	 Feeding on yon brae sae bonnie?
	 They're a' mine, and they'll sune be thine,
	 And what needs your mither be sorrie for ye?
228A.13	 'Dinna ye see yon bonnie white house,
	 Shining on yon brae sae bonnie?
	 And I am the Earl of the Isle of Skye,
	 And surely my Peggie will be ca'd a lady.'

228B: Glasgow Peggie


228B.1	 THE Lawland lads think they are fine,
	 But the Hieland lads are brisk and gaucy,
	 And they are awa, near Glasgow toun,
	 To steal awa a bonnie lassie.
228B.2	 'I wad gie my gude brown steed,
	 And sae wad I my gude grey naigie,
	 That I war fifty miles frae the toun,
	 And nane wi me but my bonnie Peggy.'
228B.3	 But up then spak the auld gudman,
	 And vow! but he spak wondrous saucie;
	 'Ye may steal awa our cows and ewes,
	 But ye sanna get our bonnie lassie.'
228B.4	 'I have got cows and ewes anew,
	 I've got gowd and gear already;
	 Sae I dinna want your cows nor ewes,
	 But I will hae your bonnie Peggy.'
228B.5	 'I'll follow you oure moss and muir,
	 I'll follow you oure mountains many,
	 I'll follow you through frost and snaw,
	 I'll stay na langer wi my daddie.'
228B.6	 He set her on a gude brown steed,
	 Himself upon a gude grey naigie;
	 They're oure hills, and oure dales,
	 And he's awa wi his bonnie Peggy.
228B.7	 As they rade out by Glasgow toun,
	 And doun by the hills o Achildounie,
	 There they met the Earl of Hume,
	 And his auld son, riding bonnie.
228B.8	 Out bespak the Earl of Hume,
	 And O! but he spak wondrous sorry;
	 'The bonniest lass about a' Glasgow toun
	 This day is awa wi a Hieland laddie!'
228B.9	 As they rade bye auld Drymen toun,
	 The lasses leuch and lookit saucy,
	 That the bonniest lass they ever saw
	 Sud be riding awa wi a Hieland laddie.
228B.10	 They rode on through moss and muir,
	 And so did they owre mountains many,
	 Until that they cam to yonder glen,
	 And she's lain doun wi her Hieland laddie.
228B.11	 Gude green hay was Peggy's bed,
	 And brakens war her blankets bonnie,
	 Wi his tartan plaid aneath her head;
	 And she's lain doun wi her Hieland laddie.
228B.12	 'There's beds and bowsters in my father's house,
	 There's sheets and blankets, and a' thing ready,
	 And wadna they be angry wi me,
	 To see me lie sae wi a Hieland laddie!'
228B.13	 'Tho there's beds and beddin in your father's house,
	 Sheets and blankets, and a' made ready,
	 Yet why sud they be angry wi thee,
	 Though I be but a Hieland laddie?
228B.14	 'It's I hae fifty acres of land,
	 It's a' plowd and sawn already;
	 I am Donald, the Lord of Skye,
	 And why sud na Peggy be calld a lady?
228B.15	 'I hae fifty gude milk kye,
	 A' tied to the staws already;
	 I am Donald, the Lord of Skye,
	 And why sud na Peggy be calld a lady?
228B.16	 'See ye no a' yon castles and towrs?
	 The sun sheens owre them a sae bonnie;
	 I am Donald, the Lord of Skye,
	 I think I'll mak ye as blythe as onie.'
228B.17	 A' that Peggy left behind
	 Was a cot-house and a wee kail-yardie;
	 Now I think she is better by far
	 Than tho she had got a Lawland lairdie.

228C: Glasgow Peggie


228C.*	 * * *
	 'HE set her on his bonnie black horse,
	 He set himsel on his gude grey naigie;
	 He has ridden over hills, he has ridden over dales,
	 And he's quite awa wi my bonny Peggy.
228C.2	 'Her brow it is brent and her middle it is jimp,
	 Her arms are long and her fingers slender;
	 One sight of her eyes makes my very heart rejoice,
	 And wae's my heart that we should sunder!'
228C.3	 His sheets were of the good green hay,
	 His blankets were of the brackens bonnie;
	 He's laid his trews beneath her head,
	 And she's lain down wi her Highland laddie.
228C.4	 'I am my mother's ae daughter,
	 And she had nae mair unto my daddie,
	 And this night she would have a sore, sore heart
	 For to see me lye down with a Highland laddie.'
228C.5	 'Ye are your mother's ae daughter,
	 And she had nae mae unto your daddie;
	 This night she need not have a sore, sore heart
	 For to see you lie down with a Highland laddie.
228C.6	 'I have four-and-twenty acres of land,
	 It is ploughed, it is sown, and is always ready,
	 And you shall have servants at your command;
	 And why should you slight a Highland laddie?
228C.7	 'I have four-and-twenty good milk-kye,
	 They are feeding on yon meadow bonnie;
	 Besides, I have both lambs and ewes,
	 Going low in the haughs o Galla water.
228C.8	 'My house it stands on yon hill-side,
	 My broadsword, durk, and bow is ready,
	 And you shall have servants at your command;
	 And why may not Peggy be called a lady?'

228D: Glasgow Peggie


228D.1	 A BONNY laddie brisk and gay,
	 A handsome youth sae brisk and gaddie,
	 And he is on to Glasgow town,
	 To steal awa his bonny Peggy.
228D.2	 When he came into Glasgow town,
	 Upon her father's green sae steady,
	 'Come forth, come forth, old man,' he says,
	 'For I am come for bonny Peggy.'
228D.3	 Out it spake her father then;
	 'Begone from me, ye Highland laddie;
	 There's nane in a' the West Country
	 Dare steal from me my bonny Peggy.'
228D.4	 'I've ten young men all at my back,
	 That ance to me were baith true and steady;
	 If ance I call, they'll soon be nigh,
	 And bring to me my bonny Peggy.'
228D.5	 Out it spake her mother then,
	 Dear! but she spake wondrous saucy;
	 Says, Ye may steal a cow or ewe,
	 But I'll keep sight o my ain lassie.
228D.6	 'Hold your tongue, old woman,' he says,
	 'Ye think your wit it is fu ready;
	 For cow nor ewe I ever stole,
	 But I will steal your bonny Peggy.'
228D.7	 Then all his men they boldly came,
	 That was to him baith true and steady,
	 And thro the ha they quickly went,
	 And forth they carried bonny Peggy.
228D.8	 Her father gae mony shout and cry,
	 Her mother cursed the Highland laddie;
	 But he heard them as he heard them not,
	 But fixd his eye on bonny Peggy.
228D.9	 He set her on his milk-white steed,
	 And he himsell on his grey naigie;
	 Still along the way they rode,
	 And he's awa wi bonny Peggy.
228D.10	 Says, I wad gie baith cow and ewe,
	 And sae woud I this tartan plaidie,
	 That I was far into the north,
	 And alang wi me my bonny Peggy.
228D.11	 As they rode down yon pleasant glen,
	 For trees and brambles were right mony,
	 There they met the Earl o Hume,
	 And his young son, were riding bonny.
228D.12	 Then out it spake the young Earl Hume,
	 Dear! but he spake wondrous gaudie;
	 'I'm wae to see sae fair a dame
	 Riding alang wi a Highland laddie.'
228D.13	 'Hold you tongue, ye young Earl Hume,
	 O dear! but ye do speak right gaudie;
	 There's nae a lord in a' the south
	 Dare eer compete wi a Highland laddie.'
228D.14	 Then he rade five miles thro the north,
	 Thro mony hills sae rough and scroggie,
	 Till they came down to a low glen,
	 And he lay down wi bonny Peggy.
228D.15	 Then he inclosed her in his arms,
	 And rowd her in his tartan plaidie:
	 'There are blankets and sheets in my father's house,
	 How have I lien down wi a Highland laddie!'
228D.16	 Says he, There are sheep in my father's fauld,
	 And every year their wool is ready;
	 By the same our debts we pay,
	 Altho I be but a Highland laddie.
228D.17	 'There are fifty cows in my father's byre,
	 That all are tyed to the stakes and ready,
	 Five thousand pounds I hae ilk year,
	 Altho I be but a Highland laddie.
228D.18	 'My father has fifty well shod horse,
	 Besides your steed and my grey naigie;
	 I'm Donald o the Isle o Sky,
	 Why may not you be ca'd a lady?
228D.19	 'See ye not yon fine castle,
	 On yonder hill that stands sae gaudie?
	 And there we'll win this very night,
	 Where ye'll enjoy your Highland laddie.'

228E: Glasgow Peggie


228E.1	 THE Hielan lads sae brisk and braw,
	 The Hielan lads sae brisk and gaudie,
	 Hae gane awa to Glasgow town,
	 To steal awa the bonny Peggy.
228E.2	 As they came on to Glasgow town,
	 And passd the banks and braes sae bonny,
	 There they espied the weel-faurd may,
	 And she said to them her name was Peggy.
228E.3	 Their chief did meet her father soon,
	 And O! but he was wondrous angry;
	 Says, Ye may steal my owsen and kye,
	 But ye maunna steal my bonnie Peggy.
228E.4	 'O haud your tongue, ye gude auld man,
	 For I've got cows and ewes already;
	 I come na to steal your owsen and kye,
	 But I will steal your bonny Peggy.'
228E.5	 He set her on a milk-white steed,
	 And he himsel rode a gude grey naigie,
	 And they are on mony miles to the north,
	 And nane wi them but the bonny Peggy.
228E.6	 'I hae fifty acres o gude red lan,
	 And a' weel ploughd and sawn already,
	 And why should your father be angry wi me,
	 And ca me naething but a Hielan laddie?
228E.7	 'I hae twenty weel mounted steeds,
	 Black and brown and grey, already;
	 And ilk ane o them is tended by a groom,
	 Altho I be but a Hielan laddie.
228E.8	 'I hae now ten thousand sheep,
	 A' feeding on yon braes sae bonny,
	 And ilka hundred a shepherd has,
	 Altho I be but a Hieland laddie.
228E.9	 'I hae a castle on yonder hill,
	 It's a' set roun wi windows many;
	 I'm Lord M'Donald o the whole Isle of Skye;
	 And why shouldna Peggy be ca'd my Lady?'
228E.10	 Now a' that Peggy had before
	 Was a wee cot-house and a little kail-yairdie,
	 But now she is lady o the whole Isle o Skye,
	 And now bonny Peggy is ca'd my Lady.

228F: Glasgow Peggie


228F.1	 THE young Maclean is brisk and bauld,
	 The young Maclean is rash an ready,
	 An he is to the Lowlands gane,
	 To steal awa a bonnie ladye.
	 * * * * *
228F.2	 Out an spak her auld father,
	 An O! but he spak wondrous angry;
	 'Ye may steal my cows an ewes,
	 But ye shall not steal my dochter Peggie.'
228F.3	 'O haud your tongue, ye gude auld man,
	 For I hae gear enough already;
	 I cum na for your cows an ewes,
	 But I cum for your dochter Peggie.'
228F.4	 He set her on a milk-white steed,
	 Himsel upon a gude gray naggie,
	 An they are to the Highlands gane,
	 The young Maclean an his bonnie ladye.

228[G]: Glasgow Peggie


228[G].1	It was on a day, and a fine summer's day,
	 When the Lowlands they were making ready,
	 There I espied a weel-far'd lass,
	 She was gaun to Glasgow, and they ca her Peggy.
228[G.2]	It's up then spak a silly auld man,
	 And O but he spak wondrous poorly!
	 Sayin, Ye may steal awa my cows and my ewes,
	 But ye'll never steal awa my bonny Peggy.
228[G.3]	'O haud yer tongue, ye silly auld man,
	 For ye hae said eneugh already,
	 For I'll never steal awa yer cows and yer ewes,
	 But I'll steal awa yer bonny Peggy.'
228[G.4]	So he mounted her on a milk-white steed,
	 Himsel upon a wee grey naigie,
	 And they hae ridden ower hill and dale,
	 And over moors and mosses many.
228[G.5]	They rade till they cam to the head o yon glen,
	 It might hae frightened anybody;
	 He said, Whether will ye go alongst with me,
	 Or will ye return back again to your mammie?
	 * * * * *
228[G.6]	Their bed was o the green, green grass,
	 And their blankets o the bracken sae bonnie,
	 And he's laid his trews beneath their head,
	 And Peggy's lain doun wi her Heilan laddie.
228[G.7]	They lay till it cam to the break o day,
	 Then up they rose and made them ready;
	 He said, Whether will ye go alongst with me,
	 Or will ye return back again to your mammie?
228[G.8]	'I'll follow you through frost and snow,
	 I'll follow your through dangers many,
	 And wherever ye go I will go alongst with you,
	 For I'll never return back again to my mammie.'
228[G.9]	'I hae four-and-twenty gude milk-kye,
	 They're a' bun in yon byre sae bonny,
	 And I am the earl o the Isle o Skye,
	 And why should not Peggy be called a lady?
228[G.10]	'I hae fifty acres o gude land,
	 A' ploughed ower and sawn sae bonny,
	 And I am young Donald o the Isle o Skye,
	 And wherever I'm laird I'll make ye lady.'

Next: 229. Earl Crawford






E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III