The Traditional Children's Games of England Scotland
& Ireland In Dictionary Form - Volume 2

With Tunes(sheet music), Singing-rhymes(lyrics), Methods Of Playing with diagrams and illustrations.

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PUSH THE BUSINESS ON                        87
II. Beeswax and turpentine make the best of plaster,
The more you try to pull it off, it's sure to stick the faster. I'll buy a horse and hire a gig, And all the world shall have a jig; And you and I'll do all we can To push the business on, To push the business on; And we'll do all that ever we can To push the business on.
—Brigg, Lincolnshire (Miss Barker, from a Lincolnshire friend).
III.     I'll buy a horse and steal a gig, And all the world shall have a jig; And I'll do all that ever I can
To pass the business on.
To pass the business on, To pass the business on; And I'll do all that ever I can To pass the business on. —Wolstanton, North Staffs. (Miss Bush, Schoolmistress)
IV.     We'll borrow a horse and steal a gig, And round the world we'll have a jig; And I'll do all that ever I can
To push the business on.
—Earls Heaton (Herbert Hardy).
V. I'll hire a horse and steal a gig, And all the world shall have a jig; And I'll do all that ever I can To push the business on,
To push the business on, to push the business on, And I'll do all that ever I can to push the business on.
—Settle, Yorkshire (Rev. W. S. Sykes).
(b) The players stand in a circle, boy and girl alternately, and sing the lines. At the fourth line they all clap their hands, keeping time with the song. When singing the seventh line each boy takes the girl on his left hand,—dances round with her and places her on his right hand. This is done till







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