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How To Play the Piano Accordion

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tune my bonnie

over the sea/' The working of the bellows should fit in with
the phrasing and the rhythm of the music.

No fingering is shown for the basses, since this is a matter
of personal choice and each person usually works out the
method that suits him best. Some people like to play the
fundamental notes most of the time with the second linger,
and the chords with their first finger. Others like to use the
third finger on the fundamentals and the second finger on the
chords.

One of the most important things about the left hand's play-
ing is to use a very short, quick touch. You should press down
a button, sound the note, and lift your finger at once—or even
quicker. That is the only way you will get the clean-cut bass
effect that is needed for good playing.

Both Hands Together

Just like learning how to use both hands together on the
piano, which is a matter of practice and repetition, the accor-
dion player has to go slowly at the beginning and play simply
written tunes until he gets the knack of two-hand playing. A
good book of simple accordion exercises is also a great help at
the beginning stage and we would include a dozen or more of
thbm here if we could.

A standard exercise to use at the start is to play C with the
180

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