The English And Scottish Popular Ballads

by FRANCIS JAMES CHILD.

Home Main Menu Singing & Playing Order & Order Info Support Search Voucher Codes



Share page  Visit Us On FB

Index  Previous 

305A: The Outlaw Murray


305A.1	 ETRICK FOREST is a fair foreste,
	 In it grows manie a semelie trie;
	 The hart, the hynd, the dae, the rae,
	 And of a' [wylde] beastis grete plentie.
305A.2	 There's a castell biggit with lime and stane,
	 O gin it stands not pleasantlie!
	 In the fore front o that castell fair
	 Twa unicorns are bra to see.
305A.3	 There's the picture of a knight and a ladye bright,
	 And the grene hollin aboon their brie;
	 There an Outlaw keepis five hundred men,
	 He keepis a royalle companie.
305A.4	 His merrie men are in [ae] liverie clad,
	 Of the Lincoln grene so fair to see;
	 He and his ladie in purple clad,
	 O if they live not royallie!
305A.5	 Word is gane to our nobell king,
	 In Edinburgh where that he lay,
	 That there was an Outlaw in Etterick forest
	 Counted him nought and all his courtrie gay.
305A.6	 'I mak a vowe,' then the goode king said,
	 'Unto the man that dear bought me,
	 I'se either be king of Etrick forest,
	 Or king of Scotland that Outlaw's bee.'
305A.7	 Then spak the erle hight Hamilton,
	 And to the noble king said he;
	 My sovereign prince, sum counsell tak,
	 First of your nobles, syne of me.
305A.8	 'I redd you send yon bra Outlaw till
	 And see gif your man cum will he;
	 Desire him cum and be your man,
	 And hald of you yon forest frie.
305A.9	 'And gif he refuses to do that,
	 We'll conquess both his lands and he,
	 Or else we'll throw his castell down,
	 And mak a widowe of his gaye ladie.'
305A.10	 The king called on a gentleman,
	 James Boyd, Erle of Arran, his brother was he;
	 When James he came before the king
	 He fell before him on his knie.
305A.11	 'Welcum James Boyd,' said our nobil king,
	 'A message ye maun gang for me;
	 Ye maun hie to Etrick forrest,
	 To yon Outlaw, where dwelleth he.
305A.12	 'Ask hym of quhom he haldis his lands,
	 Or, man, wha may his master be;
	 Desyre him come and be my man,
	 And hald of me yon forrest frie.
305A.13	 'To Edinburgh to cum and gang
	 His safe-warrand I sall be;
	 And, gif he refuses to do that,
	 We'll conquess baith his lands and he.
305A.14	 'Thou mayst vow I'll cast his castell doun,
	 And mak a widow of his gay ladie;
	 I'll hang his merrie men pair by pair
	 In ony frith where I may them see.'
305A.15	 James Boyd took his leave of the nobill king,
	 To Etrick forrest fair came he;
	 Down Birkendale brae when that he cam,
	 He saw the fair forest with his ee.
305A.16	 Baith dae and rae and hart and hynd,
	 And of all wylde beastis grete plentie;
	 He heard the bows that bauldly ring,
	 And arrows whidderand near him by.
305A.17	 Of the fair castell he got a sight,
	 The like he nere saw with his ee;
	 On the fore front of that castell
	 Twa unicorns were bra to see.
305A.18	 The picture of a knight and a ladie bright,
	 And the grene hollin aboon their brie;
	 Thereat he spy'd five hundred men,
	 Shuting with bows upon the lee.
305A.19	 They a' were in ae liverie clad,
	 Of the Lincoln grene, sae fair to see;
	 The knight and his ladye in purple clad;
	 O gif they lived right royallie!
	 Therefore he kend he was master-man,
	 And served him in his ain degree.
305A.20	 'God mot thee save, brave Outlaw Murray,
	 Thy ladie and a' they chivalrie!'
	 'Marry, thou's wellcum, gentleman,
	 Sum king's-messenger thou seems to be.'
305A.21	 'The King of Scotland sent me hier,
	 And, gude Outlaw, I'm sent to thee;
	 I wad wat of whom ye hald your lands,
	 Or, man, wha may thy master be'
305A.22	 'Thir landis are mine,' the Outlaw said,
	 'I own na king in Christentie;
	 Frae Soudron I this forest wan,
	 When the king nor's knights were not to see.'
305A.23	 'He desires you'l come to Edinburgh,
	 And hald of him this forest frie;
	 And gif you refuse to do this,
	 He'll conquess both thy landis and thee;
	 He has vowd to cast thy castell down,
	 And make a widow of thy gaye ladie.
305A.24	 'He'll hang thy merrie men pair by pair,
	 In ony frith where he may them finde;'
	 'Aye, by my troth,' the Outlaw said,
	 'Then wad I think me far behinde.
305A.25	 'Eere the king my fair countrie get,
	 This land that's nativest to me,
	 Mony of his nobils sall be cauld,
	 Their ladies sall be right wearie.'
305A.26	 Then spak his ladye fair of face,
	 She said, Without consent of me
	 That an outlaw shuld come before the king:
	 I am right rad of treasonrie.
305A.27	 'Bid him be gude to his lordis at hame,
	 For Edinburgh my lord sall never see:'
	 James tuke his leave of the Outlaw keene,
	 To Edinburgh boun is he.
305A.28	 And when he came before the king,
	 He fell before him on his knie:
	 'Wellcum, James Boyd,' said the nobil king,
	 'What foreste is Etrick forest frie?'
305A.29	 'Etrick forest is the fairest forest
	 That ever man saw with his ee;
	 There's the dae, the rae, the hart, the hynde,
	 And of all wild beastis great plentie.
305A.30	 'There's a prittie castell of lime and stone,
	 O gif it stands not pleasauntlie!
	 There's on the fore side of that castell
	 Twa unicorns sae bra to see.
305A.31	 'There's the picture of a knight and [a] ladie bright,
	 And the grene hollin aboon their brie;
	 There the Outlaw keepis five hundred men,
	 O gif they live not royallie!
305A.32	 'His merry men in [ae] liverie clad,
	 O the Lincoln grene, so fair to see;
	 He and his ladye in purple clad,
	 O gif they live not royallie!
305A.33	 'He says yon forest is his ain,
	 He wan it from the Soudronie;
	 Sae as he won it, sae will he keep it,
	 Contrair all kings in Christentie.'
305A.34	 'Gar ray my horse,' said the nobil king,
	 'To Etrick [forest] hie will I me;'
	 Then he gard graith five thousand men,
	 And sent them on for the forest frie.
305A.35	 Then word is gane the Outlaw till,
	 In Etrick forest where dwelleth he,
	 That the king was cumand to his cuntrie,
	 To conquess baith his lands and he.
305A.36	 'I mak a vow,' the Outlaw said,
	 'I mak a vow, and that trulie,
	 Were there but three men to tak my part,
	 Yon king's cuming full deir suld be.'
305A.37	 Then messengers he called forth,
	 And bade them haste them speedilie:
	 'Ane of you go to Halliday,
	 The laird of the Corehead is he.
305A.38	 'He certain is my sister's son,
	 Bid him cum quick and succour me;
	 Tell Halliday with thee to cum,
	 And shaw him a' the veritie.'
305A.39	 'What news? what news,' said Halliday,
	 'Man, frae thy master unto me?'
	 'Not as ye wad; seeking your aid;
	 The king's his mortal enemie.'
305A.40	 'Aye, by my troth,' quoth Halliday,
	 'Even for that it repenteth me;
	 For, gif he lose fair Ettrick forest,
	 He'll take fair Moffatdale frae me.
305A.41	 'I'll meet him wi five hundred men,
	 And surely mae, if mae may be:'
	 [The Outlaw calld a messenger,
	 And bid him hie him speedily.]
305A.42	 'To Andrew Murray of Cockpool,
	 That man's a deir cousin to me;
	 Desire him cum and make me aid,
	 With all the power that he may be.
305A.43	 'The king has vowd to cast my castell down,
	 And mak a widow of my gay ladye;
	 He'll hang my merry men pair by pair
	 I[n] ony place where he may them see.'
305A.44	 'It stands me hard,' quoth Andrew Murray,
	 'Judge if it stands not hard with me,
	 To enter against a king with crown,
	 And put my lands in jeopardie.
305A.45	 'Yet, gif I cum not on the daye,
	 Surelie at night he sall me see:'
	 To Sir James Murray, laird of Traquair,
	 A message came right speedilie.
305A.46	 'What news? what news,' James Murray said,
	 'Man, frae thy master unto me?'
	 'What needs I tell? for well ye ken
	 The king's his mortal enemie.
305A.47	 'He desires ye'll cum and make him aid,
	 With all the powers that ye may be:'
	 'And, by my troth,' James Murray said,
	 'With that Outlaw I'll live and die.
305A.48	 'The king has gifted my lands lang syne,
	 It can not be nae war with me;'
	 . . . . . . . .
	 . . . . . . . .
305A.49	 The king was cumand thro Cadden ford,
	 And fiftene thousand men was he;
	 They saw the forest them before,
	 They thought it awsom for to see.
305A.50	 Then spak the erle hight Hamilton,
	 And to the nobil king said he,
	 My sovereign prince, sum counsell take,
	 First at your nobles, syne at me.
305A.51	 'Desyre him meet you at Penman's Core,
	 And bring four in his cumpanie;
	 Fyve erles sall gang yoursell before,
	 Gude cause that you suld honord be.
305A.52	 'And, if he refuses to do that,
	 Wi fire and sword we'll follow thee;
	 There sall never a Murray after him
	 Have land in Etrick forest frie.'
305A.53	 The king then called a gentleman,
	 Royal-banner-bearer then was he,
	 James Hope Pringle of Torsonse by name;
	 He came and knelit upon his knie.
305A.54	 'Welcum, James Pringle of Torsonse;
	 Ye man a message gae for me;
	 Ye man gae to yon Outlaw Murray,
	 Surely where bauldly bideth he.
305A.55	 'Bid him meet me at Penman's Core,
	 And bring four of his companie;
	 Five erles sall cum wi mysell,
	 Gude reason I suld honord be.
305A.56	 'And if he refuses to do that,
	 Bid him look for nae gude o me;
	 There sall never a Murray after him
	 Have land in Etric forest frie.'
305A.57	 James came before the Outlaw keene,
	 And served him in his ain degree:
	 'Wellcum, James Pringle of Torsonse,
	 What tidings frae the king to me?'
305A.58	 'He bids you meet him at Penman's Core,
	 And bring four of your companie;
	 Five erles will cum with the king,
	 Nae more in number will he be.
305A.59	 'And gif you refuse to do that,
	 I freely here upgive with thee,
	 There will never a Murray after thee
	 Have land in Etrick forest frie.
305A.60	 'He'll cast your bonny castell down,
	 And make a widow of your gay ladie,
	 He'll hang your merry men pair by pair
	 In ony place where he may them see.'
305A.61	 'It stands me hard,' the Outlaw said,
	 'Judge if it stands not hard with me;
	 I reck not of losing of mysell,
	 But all my offspring after me.
305A.62	 'Auld Haliday, young Haliday,
	 Ye sall be twa to gang wi me;
	 Andrew Murray and Sir James Murray,
	 We'll be nae mae in cumpanie.'
305A.63	 When that they came before the king,
	 They fell before him on their knee:
	 'Grant mercy, mercy, royal king,
	 Een for his sake who died on tre!'
305A.64	 'Sicken-like mercy sall ye have,
	 On gallows ye sall hangit be;'
	 'God forbid!' quo the Outlaw then,
	 'I hope your Grace will better be.
305A.65	 'These lands of Etrick forest fair,
	 I wan them frae the enemie;
	 Like as I wan them, sae will I keep them,
	 Contrair all kings in Christentie.'
305A.66	 All the nobilis said, the king about,
	 Pitye it were to see him die:
	 'Yet graunt me mercye, sovereign prince,
	 Extend your favour unto me!
305A.67	 'I'll give you the keys of my castell,
	 With the blessing of my fair ladie;
	 Mak me the sheriff of the forest,
	 And all my offspring after me.'
305A.68	 lt thou give me the keys of thy castell,
	 With the blessing of thy fair ladye?
	 I'll mak the[e] shiryff of the forest,
	 Surely while upwards grows the trie;
	 If you be not traytour to the king,
	 Forfaulted sall ye never be.'
305A.69	 'But, prince, what sall cum o my men?
	 When I go back, traitour they'll ca me;
	 I had rather lose my life and land,
	 Eer my merry men rebuk d me.'
305A.70	 ll your merry men amend their lives
	 And all their pardouns I grant thee:
	 Now name thy landes whe'ere they be,
	 And here I render them to thee.'
305A.71	 'Fair Philiphaugh, prince, is my awin,
	 I biggit it wi lime and stane;
	 The Tinnies and the Hangingshaw,
	 My leige, are native steeds of mine.
305A.72	 '. . . . . . .
	 . . . . . . .
	 I have mony steeds in the forest shaw,
	 But them by name I dinna knaw.'
305A.73	 The keys of the castell he gave the king,
	 With the blessing of his fair ladye;
	 He was made sheryff of Etrick forest,
	 Surely while upward grows the trie;
	 And, if he was not traytour to the king,
	 Forfaulted he suld never be.
305A.74	 Wha ever heard, in ony tymes,
	 Sicken an outlaw in his degree
	 Sic favour get before a king
	 As did the Outlaw Murray of the forest frie?

305B: The Outlaw Murray


305B.1	 ETTERICK FOREST's pleasant land,
	 And it grows mony a bonny tree;
	 With buck and doe and a' wild beast,
	 As castle stands right bonnilie.
305B.2	 Yon castle has twa unicorns,
	 The like I never saw wi my ee,
	 The picture of a knight and lady bright,
	 And the green hollin's aboon her [bree].
305B.3	 Word is gane to Edinbro town
	 . . . . . . .
	 That there's an Outlaw in Etterick forest
	 That keeps as fine a court as he.
305B.4	 The king has sworn a solemn oath,
	 And he has sworn by [the Virgin Mary],
	 He would either be king of Etterick forest,
	 Or king of Scotland the Outlaw should be.
305B.5	 He has ca'd up Mr James Boyd,
	 A highland laird I'm sure was he:
	 'Ye must gae to Etterick forest
	 And see of wha he hads his land,
	 And wha pays yon men meat and fee.'
305B.6	 He's tane his leave o the king and court,
	 Een as hard as he may dree;
	 When he came in O'er London edge,
	 He viewed the forest wi his eee.
305B.7	 He thought it was as pleasant a land
	 As ever his two eyes did see,
	 But when he came in oer . . '.,
	 They were a' ranked on Newark lee.
305B.8	 O waly, but they were bonny to see!
	 Five hundred men playing at the ba;
	 They were a' clad in the Lincoln green,
	 And the Outlaw's sell in taffety.
305B.9	 'Weel met you save, Outlaw,' he says,
	 'You and your brave companie;
	 The King of Scotland hath sent me here,
	 To see whom on you hold your lands,
	 Or who pays thir men meat and fee.'
305B.10	 The first ae man the answer made,
	 It was the Outlaw he:
	 'The lands they are all mine,
	 And I pay thir men meat and fee,
	 And as I wan them so will I lose them,
	 Contrair the kings o Cristendie.
305B.11	 'I never was a king's subject,
	 And a king's subject I'll never be;
	 For I wan them i the fields fighting,
	 Where him and his nobles durst not come and see.'
305B.12	 O out bespeaks the Outlaw's lady,
	 I wot she spake right wisely;
	 'Be good unto your nobles at home,
	 For Edinbro mine shall never see;'
	 But meat and drink o the best I'm sure got he.
305B.13	 He has taen his leave o the Outlaw free,
	 And een as hard as he may dree,
	 While he came to the king's court,
	 Where he kneeld low down on his knee.
305B.14	 'What news? what news, James,' he says,
	 'Frae yon Outlaw and his company?'
	 'Yon forest is as fine a land
	 As ever I did see.
305B.15	 'Yon Outlaw keeps as fine a court
	 As any king in Cristendie;
	 Yon lands they are here all his own,
	 And he pays yon men meat and fee,
	 And as he wan them so will he lose them,
	 Contrair the kings of Cristendie.
305B.16	 'He never was a king's subject,
	 And a king's subject he'll never be;
	 For he wan them in the fields fighting,
	 Where the king and his nobles durst not come to see.'
305B.17	 The king has sworn a solemn oath,
	 And he has sworn by the Virgin Mary,
	 He would either be king of Etterick forest,
	 Or king of Scotland the Outlaw should be.
305B.18	 The king has ca'd up Mr James Pringle,
	 Laird of Torson[s]e at the time was he:
	 'Ye must gae to Etterick forest,
	 And see wha of he hads his land,
	 And wha pays yon men meat and fee.'
305B.19	 He's tane his leave o the king and court,
	 Een as hard as he may dree;
	 When he came in O'er London edge,
	 He viewed the forest wi his eee.
305B.20	 He thought it was as pleasant a land
	 As ever his two eyes did see,
	 But when he came in oer . . '.,
	 They were a' ranked on Newark lee.
305B.21	 O waly, but they were bonny to see!
	 Five hundred men playing at the ba;
	 They were a' clad in the Lincoln green,
	 And the Outlaw's sell in taffety.
305B.22	 'Weel met you save, Outlaw,' he says,
	 'You and your brave companie;
	 The King of Scotland hath sent me here,
	 To see whom on you hold your lands,
	 Or who pays thir men meat and fee.'
305B.23	 The first ae man the answer made,
	 It was the Outlaw he:
	 'The lands they are all mine,
	 And I pay thir men meat and fee,
	 And as I wan them so will I lose them,
	 Contrair the kings o Cristendie.
305B.24	 'I never was a king's subject,
	 And a king's subject I'll never be;
	 For I wan them i the fields fighting,
	 Where him and his nobles durst not come and see.'
305B.25	 O out bespeaks the Outlaw's lady,
	 I wot she spake right wisely;
	 'Be good unto your nobles at home,
	 For Edinbro mine shall never see;'
	 But meat and drink o the best I'm sure got he.
305B.26	 'And as I wan them so will I lose them,
	 Contrair the kings o Cristendie;
	 I wan them frae the Soudan Turk,
	 Whem their cuckold king durst not come to see;
	 For I wan them in the fields fighting,
	 Where him and his nobles durst not come to see.'
305B.27	 O out bespeaks the Outlaw's lady,
	 I wot she spake right wisely;
	 'Be good unto your nobles at home,
	 For Edinbro mine shall never see;'
	 But meat and drink o the best I'm sure got he.
305B.28	 He has taen his leave o the Outlaw free,
	 And een as hard as he may dree,
	 While he came to the king's court,
	 Where he kneeld low down on his knee.
305B.29	 'What news? what news, James,' he says,
	 'Frae yon Outlaw and his company?'
	 'Yon forest is as fine a land
	 As ever I did see.
305B.30	 'Yon Outlaw keeps as fine a court
	 As any king in Cristendie;
	 Yon lands they are here all his own,
	 And he pays yon men meat and fee,
	 And as he wan them so will he lose them,
	 Contrair the kings of Cristendie.
305B.31	 'He hever was a king's subject,
	 And a king's subject he'll never be;
	 For he wan them in the fields fighting,
	 Where the king and his nobles durst not come to see.'
305B.32	 The king has sworn a solemn oath,
	 And he has sworn by the Virgin Mary,
	 He would either be king of Etterick forest,
	 Or king of Scotland the Outlaw should be.
305B.33	 'Gar warn me Perthshire and Angus both,
	 Fifeshire up and down, and Loudons three,
	 For I fear of them we hae great need,
	 . . . . . . . '.'
305B.34	 Then word is come to the Outlaw then,
	 'Our noble king comes o the morn,
	 Landless men ye will a' be;'
	 He's called up his little foot-page,
	 His sister's son I trow was he.
305B.35	 'Ye must tak Etterick head
	 Een as hard as ye can drie;
	 Ye must gae to the Corhead and tell
	 Andrew Brown this frae me.
305B.36	 'The noble king comes in the morn,
	 And landless men we will a' be;
	 . . . . . . .
	 And tell him to send me some supply.'
305B.37	 The boy has taen Etterick head,
	 And een has hard as he may drie,
	 Till he came to the Corhead,
	 And he shouted out and cry'd well he.
305B.38	 'What news? what news, my little boy?
	 What news has thy master to me?'
	 'The noble king comes in the morn,
	 And landless then ye will a' be.
305B.39	 'Ye must meet him on the morn,
	 And mak him some supply;'
	 'For if he get the forest fair frae him,
	 He'll hae Moffat-dale frae me.
305B.40	 'I'll meet him the morn wi five hundred men,
	 And fifty mair, if they may be;
	 And if he get the forest fair
	 We'll a' die on the Newark lee.'
305B.41	 Word is gane to the Border then,
	 To . . . , the country-keeper I'm sure was he:
	 'The noble king comes in the morn,
	 And landless me ye will a' be.'
305B.42	 'I'll meet him the morn wi five hundred men,
	 And fifty mair, if they may be;
	 And if he get the forest fair,
	 We'll a' die on the Newark lee.'
305B.43	 Word is gane to Philiphaugh,
	 His sister's son I'm sure was he,
	 To meet him the morn wi some supply,
	 'For the noble king comes in the morn,
	 And landless men ye will a' be.'
305B.44	 'In the day I daur not be seen,
	 For he took a' my lands frae me
	 And gifted me them back again;
	 Therefore against him I must not be;
	 For if I be found against him rebel,
	 It will be counted great treason[rie].
305B.45	 'In the day I daur not be seen,
	 But in the night he shall me find
	 With five hundred men and fifty, if they may be,
	 And before he get the forest fair
	 We'll a' die on the Newark lee.'
305B.46	 n the king came in oer Loudon edge,
	 Wi three thousand weel teld was he,
	 And when he came in oer . . .
	 He viewd that forest wi his ee.
305B.47	 The Outlaw and his men were a'
	 Ranked on the Newark lee;
	 They were a' clad in the Lincoln green,
	 And he himsell in the taffety.
305B.48	 An auld grey-haird knight has taen aff his cap,
	 . . . . . . .
	 'Pardon, pardon, my sovereign liege,
	 Two or three words to speak wi you.
305B.49	 'If you please to send for the Outlaw,
	 To see if he could with you agree,
	 There's not a man yon Outlaw has
	 But of yours he'll choose to be.'
305B.50	 The king he has taen af his cap,
	 He held it on his majesty;
	 'I'll meet him the morn at the poor man's house,
	 In number not above two or three;'
	 The Outlaw says, I'll hae as few as thee.
305B.51	 'There's Andrew Brown, and Andrew Murray,
	 And Mess James Murray shall gang wi me,
	 . . . . . . . .
	 And nae mae shall my number be.'
305B.52	 And when they came to the poor man's core
	 They waited two lang hours or three,
	 And they were aware of the noble king coming,
	 And hundreds three in his company.
305B.53	 'I wonder what the muckle Deel
	 He'll learned kings to lie,
	 For to fetch me here frae amang my men
	 Even like a dog for to die;
	 But before I gang to Edinbro town
	 Monny toom saddles shall there be.'
305B.54	 The king he has taen aff his cap;
	 . . . . . .
	 'It [were] great offence here,' he says,
	 'And great pity to see thee die.
305B.55	 'For thou shalt be laerd o this forest fair
	 As lang as upwards grows the tree
	 and downward the twa rivers run,
	 If the steads thou can but rightly name to me'
305B.56	 'There's Hangingshaw high and Hangingshaw laigh,
	 . . . . . . .
	 The Tinis and the Tinis-burn,
	 The Newark and the Newark lee.'
	 * * * * * * *

305C: The Outlaw Murray


305C.1	 'GAE fetch to me James Pringle wi hast,
	 An see that he come speedilie,
	 For he maun on to Ettrick forest,
	 An see whae pays yon men meat and fee.'
305C.2	 When James Pringle cam down oer Birkendalee,
	 The hawks war yellin right loudlie,
	 The hunds war rinnin oer hill and dale,
	 As the bugle-horn soundit bonnilie.
305C.3	 'Gae tell yer king this land's my ain,
	 An to thir men I pay meat and fee;
	 I took it thrae the Souden Turk,
	 When nae sic cuckold king might be.
305C.4	 'Sae as I wan, sae will I lose,
	 Spite o the kings in Christendie;
	 I never was a king's subject,
	 Nor a king's subject will I ever be.'
305C.5	 'Outlaw Murray says yon land's his ain,
	 And to yon men he pays meat and fee;
	 He took it frae the Souden Turk,
	 When you and your men durstna come and see.'
305C.6	 It was than the king he gat up in hast,
	 An wow an angrie man was he!
	 'I'se either be king o Ettrick forest,
	 Or king o Scotland sal he be.
305C.7	 'Gar warn me Fife an a' Lothian land,
	 An Perth an Angus, to ride wi me,
	 For gin we war five thousan strang
	 Master and mair I fear he'll be.'
305C.8	 When the king came oer be Birkendalee,
	 He spy'd the forest wi his ee;
	 There war daes an raes an monie wild beast,
	 An a castle stannin right bonnilie.
305C.9	 An in that caslte a unicorn,
	 An, waly, but they war fair to see!
	 A warlike knight and a lady bright,
	 An the green halleen aboon her bree.
305C.10	 An Outlaw Murray an his merry men
	 War a' rankit up i the Newark lee,
	 Well mountit on a milk-white steed;
	 Waly, he rankit them bonnilie!
305C.11	 His men war a clad oer wi green,
	 An he was clad i the taffatie,
	 Wi belt an pistle by his side;
	 O waly, but they war fair to see!
	 * * * * * * *
305C.12	 'Haliday young an Halliday auld,
	 Ye ir the men that man ride wi me;
	 But gin we war five hunder strang
	 Master an mair I fear they'll be.'
	 * * * * * * *
305C.13	 'Philliphaugh it is my ain,
	 An Newark it belangs to me;
	 Lewinshope an Hanginshaw
	 Nae mortal man can claim thrae me.'
	 * * * * * * *
305C.14	 It was than James Boyd got up in hast,
	 An to his merry men a' spak he;
	 . . . . . . .
	 . . . . . . .






E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III