How To Write A Popular Song - online manual

A non-technical how-to-do it system for the aspiring song writer.

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The amateur author and composer too often fall short ot success through lack of patience and careful thought. The desire to finish and publish one's "effort" is overwhelmingly strong. Friends and admirers innocently deluge the proud creator with profuse words of too often exaggerated appre­ciation and eulogy, actually convincing the unfortunate vic­tim (for such he is) that when the song is put through the printer's or publisher's hands, "nothing can stop it from in­stantly becoming the craze of the country." It appears in print, money is spent in seemingly wise channels, but popu­larity does not appear and the writers wonder why, often placing the blame on other shoulders when it should be al­most entirely on their own.
Many a manuscript has been dropped into the waste paper basket of the publisher, or has had money expended on it by the author, or composer, in getting same published, only to die a miserable, and sometimes, instantaneous death. Yet this composition may really have contained a good or original idea in either lyrics, melody, or, perhaps both. They had not been worked out by careful thought and attention to detail,' however, and this, as has already been stated, is a fatal over­sight in the making of a successful "popular" song.
A few hints as to some of the prevalent causes that lead the inexperienced into the paths of disappointment and dis­aster may conveniently be presented here.
Awkward "intervals"—that is, intervals that are either unnatural, and do not sing gracefully, but have a jarr'ng effect on the ear, and intervals that are far apart, should be carefully avoided in a melody, especially if they occur in quirk succession, such as:
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E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III