Handbook Of Violin Playing - Online tutorial

A Tutorial For Classical Style Violin, full online instruction.

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i8
FIRST PART.
being the best, though less often obtained. The screw serves to give the stick its proper curve. The lapping helps to give the fingers a firmer hold, avoiding contact with the smooth stick. Silk, silver wire, or leather is used for the lapping.*
Resin.
To set the strings in vibration, the hair of the bow must be rubbed with resin. Its German name "Kolopho-nium" is derived from the Grecian town Kolophon, from whence it was first procured. The unprepared hair of a new bow requires a small quantity of powdered resin rubbed into it. Before the bow is used, the hair should be tried upon some instrument not in use, or upon a stretched string. During the ordinary rubbing upon the hair, care must be taken that the resin is not rubbed hard, but allowed to glide lightly over the hair.
It is very usual to hold the resin with the left and the bow with the right hand. In this way the fingers of the left hand become sticky with resin dust, which is detrimental to the stopping, and also soils the strings and fingerboard. It is better, therefore, to reverse this procedure. Good resin is supplied by Gand and Bernadel in Paris, Hammig in Leipsic, Pfab and Diel in Hamburg, and others. The mosc suicable holders are those which open on two sides, and are also provided with a cover.**
Violin cases.
A good violin is worthy of a good case, to protect it against dust and damp. It should be so filled that the violin lies in it securely, and yet may be easily taken out. A leather covering for the case is also convenient, by
* Kid ot reasonable substance gives a pleasant hold for the fingers, although wire is in greater favour with bow makers for appearance sake. But it is apt to tarnish and unravel, especially where the thumb comes in contact with it. Tr.
** A convenient form is that provided by many English dealers, consisting simply of a round box, preferably of tin, with a hole in the bottom for the finger to push the resin up, preserving the upper surface level. Tr.
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