The Traditional Children's Games of England Scotland
& Ireland In Dictionary Form - Volume 2

With Tunes(sheet music), Singing-rhymes(lyrics), Methods Of Playing with diagrams and illustrations.

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ADDENDA                                     415
Which of us all do you love best, do you love best, do you
love best, Which of us all do you love best, my dilsee dollsie dee. Which of us all do you love best, my dilsee dollsie dofficer. The child in the centre says—
You're all too black and ugly (three times), my dilsee
dollsie dee, You're all too black and ugly, my dilsee dollsie dofficeiv The first verse is repeated, and the child in the centre points to one in the ring and says—
This is the one that I love best, that I love best, that I
love best, This is the one that I love best, my dilsee dollsie dee. This is the one I love the best, my dilsee dollsie dofficer. The centre child takes the one selected by the hand, and they stand together in the centre, while the ring dances round and sings—
Open the gates to let the bride out, to let the bride out, to
let the bride out, Open the gates to let the bride out, my dilsee dollsie dee. Open the gates to let the bride out, my dilsee dollsie dofficer. The children then unclasp hands, and the two children walk out. Another child goes in the centre and the game is begun again, and continued until the ring is too small for dancing round. Sometimes, instead of this, the two children return to the ring singing, " Open the gates and let the bride in,'' and then they take places in the circle, while another goes in the centre.—(Dr. A. C. Haddon.)
Doagan. An extraordinary game, which was played by Manx children sixty years ago. A rude wooden representation of the human form was fastened on a cross, and sticks were thrown at it, just after the fashion of the modern "Aunt Sally." But it is quite possible that this game, taken in connection with the following very curious words which the children repeated when throwing the sticks, is a survival of a more serious function—







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