The Traditional Children's Games of England Scotland
& Ireland In Dictionary Form - Volume 2

With Tunes(sheet music), Singing-rhymes(lyrics), Methods Of Playing with diagrams and illustrations.

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248
THREE DUKES
XXX. There's a young man that wants a sweetheartó Wants a sweetheartówants a sweetheartó There's a young man that wants a sweetheart, To the ransom tansom tidi-de-o.
Let him come out and choose his own, Choose his own, choose his own ; Let him come out and choose his own, To the ransom tansom tidi-de-o.
Will any of my fine daughters do, &c.
They are all too black and brawny, They sit in the sun uncloudy, With golden chains around their necks, They are too black and brawny.
Quite good enough for you, sir! &c.
I'll walk in the kitchen, and walk in the hall,
I'll take the fairest among you all;
The fairest of all that I can see,
Is pretty Miss Watts, come out to me.
Will you come out ?
Oh, no ! oh, no !
Naughty Miss Watts she won't come out, She won't come out, she won't come out; Naughty Miss Watts she won't come out, To help us in our dancing. Won't you come out ?
Oh, yes ! oh, yes !
óDorsetshire (Folk-lore Journal, vii. 223-224).
(V.) Three children, generally boys, are chosen to represent the three dukes. The rest of the players represent maidens. The three dukes stand in line facing the maidens, who hold hands, and also stand in line. Sufficient space is left between the two lines to admit of each line in turn advancing and retiring. The three dukes commence by singing the first verse, advanc≠ing and retiring in line while doing so. The line of maidens then advances singing the second verse. The alternate verses







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