The Traditional Children's Games of England Scotland
& Ireland In Dictionary Form - Volume 2

With Tunes(sheet music), Singing-rhymes(lyrics), Methods Of Playing with diagrams and illustrations.

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120               ROSY APPLE, LEMON AND PEAR
Take her by the lily-white hand, Lead her on the water; Give her kisses,—one, two, three,— For she's her mother's daughter.
—Fraserburgh (Rev. W. Gregor).
XI. Roses up, and roses down, And roses in the garden; I wadna gie a bunch o' roses For twopence ha'penny farthin\
---------, fresh and fair,
A bunch of roses she shall wear; Gold and silver by her side, I know who's her bride.
Take her by the lily-white hand,
And lead her o'er the water;
And give her kisses,—one, two, three,—
For she's the princess' daughter.
—Cullen (Rev. W. Gregor).
«
XII. Maggie Black, fresh and fair,
A bunch of roses she shall wear; I know who HI take. Give her kisses,—one, two, three,— For she's a lady's daughter.
Roses in, and roses out,
Roses in a garden;
I would not give a bunch of roses
For twopence halfpenny " farden."
—Nairn (Rev. W. Gregor).
(c) The players form a ring, one child stands in the centre, who chooses a sweetheart from the ring when the fifth line is sung; the two kiss, the first child takes her place in the ring, the second child remains in the centre, and the game begins again. This is the method adopted in most of the versions. The Symondsbury game is slightly different; the first part is the same, but when the last line is sung the child who was first in the middle must run away and take a place in the ring as soon as she can. The second one remains in







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