The Traditional Children's Games of England Scotland
& Ireland In Dictionary Form - Volume 2

With Tunes(sheet music), Singing-rhymes(lyrics), Methods Of Playing with diagrams and illustrations.

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PRETTY MISS PINK
77
originally to some independent game like "Sally, Sally Water," and that, when divorced from their original context, they lent themselves to the various changes which have been made. The minute application of modern ideas is seen in the version from Gambledown, where "A bottle of wine and a guinea, too," becomes " A bottle of wine and a biscuit, too;" and at West Haddon, in Northamptonshire, a variant of the marriage formula is given in Northants Notes and Queries, ii. 106, as—
Now you're married, we wish you joy, First a girl and then a boy; Cups and saucers, sons and daughters, Now join hands and kiss one another.
Another version from Long Itchington, given in Notes and Queries, 7th series, x. 450, concludes with—
Up the kitchen and down the hall, Choose the fairest of them all; Seven years now and seven years then, Kiss poor Sally and part again.
Pretty Miss Pink
Pretty Miss Pink, will you come out, Will you come out, will you come out ? Pretty Miss Pink, will you come out, To see the ladies dancing ?
No, I won't.
Pretty Miss Pink, she won't come out,
Won't come out, won't come out, &c.
She will come out.
Pretty Miss Pink, she has come out, &c.
—Winterton Lines and Nottinghamshire (Miss M. Peacock.)
(b) The children place themselves in a row. They each choose a colour to represent them. One player must he pink. Another player stands facing them, and dances to and fro, singing the first four lines. The dancer then sings the next two lines, and Miss Pink having answered rushes forward,







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