The Traditional Children's Games of England Scotland
& Ireland In Dictionary Form - Volume 2

With Tunes(sheet music), Singing-rhymes(lyrics), Methods Of Playing with diagrams and illustrations.

Home Main Menu Singing & Playing Order & Order Info Support Search Voucher Codes



Share page  Visit Us On FB

Previous Contents Next
66                             PRAY, PRETTY MISS
Pray, pretty Miss, will you come out
To help me in my dancing ?
Yes!
Now you are a good Miss !
Now you are a good Miss!
Now you are a good Miss !
To help me in my dancing.
—Cornwall (Folk-lore Journal, v. 47, 48).
III. Pray, pretty Miss, will you come out to help us in our
dancing ? No! Oh, then you are a naughty Miss, won't help us with
our dancing. Pray, pretty Miss, will you come out to help us in our
dancing ?
Yes!
Now we've got our jolly old lass to help us with our dancing. —Sheffield, Yorks. (Folk-lore Record, v. 87).
IV. Oh, will you come and dance with me, Oh, will you come and dance with me ? No! [They say as above to the next girl, who says "Yes."]
Now we've got our bonny bunch To help us with our dancing.
—Hurstmonceaux, Sussex (Miss Chase).
(b) The Scottish version of this game is played as follows:— All the players stand in a line except two, who stand facing them. These two join hands crosswise, and then advancing and retiring, sing to the child at the end of the line the first four lines. The first child refuses, and they then dance round, singing the second verse. They sing the first verse again, and on her compliance she joins the two, and all three dance round together, singing the last verse. The three then ad­vance and retire, singing the first verse to another child.
The Cornish version is played differently: a ring is formed, boy and girl standing alternately in the centre. The child in







E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III