Franklin Square Song Collection - online songbook

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FRANKLIN-SQUARE SONG COLLECTION.
159
Auld Lang Syne is popularly supposed to be the composition of Burns, but, in fact, he wrote only the second and third verses of the ballad as commonly sung, retouching the others from an older and less familiar song. The Old Oaken Bucket was written by Woodworth, in New York City, during the hot summer of 1817. He came into the house and drank a glass of water, and then said, " How much more refreshing it would be to take a good, long drink from the old oaken bucket that used to hang in my father's well." His wife suggested that it was a happy thought for a poem. He sat down and wrote the song as we have it. Woodman, Spare that Tree! was the result of an incident that came to the knowledge of George
P. Morris. A friend's mother had owned a little place in the country, which she was obliged, from poverty, to sell. On the property grew a large oak which had been planted by his grandfather. The purchaser of the house and land proposed to cut down the tree, and Morris's friend paid him ten dollars for a bond that the oak should be spared. Morris heard the story, saw the tree, and wrote the song. Oft in the Stilly Night was produced by Moore after his family had undergone, ap­parently, every possible misfortune; one of his children died young, another went astray, and a third was acci­dentally killed. The Light of Other Days was written for Balfe's opera, the " Maid of Artois." The opera is for­gotten, but the song still lives, and is as popular as ever.
SMILING MAY COMES IN PLAY.
Here we stand,
Hand in hand, Ready for our exercise;
Heads upright,
With delight Sparkling in our laughing eyes!
Singing cheerily,
Cheerily, cheerily, Clapping merrily, merrily, merrily,
One, two, three,
Don't you see Where scholars love to be ?
Right hand up,
Left hand up; Whirling see our fingers go!
Folded now,
Let us bow Gently to each other so!
Eastward point,
Westward point; Left hand Nadir, Zenith right;
Forward fold,
Backward fold; Arms akimbo, chest upright;
Seated now,
Smooth your brow, Then drum lightly on your crown
Oh, what fun!
Every one Driving off each surly frown!
Quickly stand,
Lungs expand, Backward let our shoulders go!
Life and health,
Comfort, wealth, We can thus improve, you know.







E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III