Popular Music Of The Olden Time Vol 2

Ancient Songs, Ballads, & Dance Tunes, Sheet Music & Lyrics - online book

Home Main Menu Singing & Playing Order & Order Info Support Search Easter Hymns



Share page  Visit Us On FB

Previous Contents Next
INDEX OF SUBJECTS.
821
" Jock o' Hazledean," 575. Numerous songs, 609 to 620. " Woo'd and married," 723. " Saw you my father?" 731. "Blue bells of Scotland," 739. " John Anderson, my jo," 770. "John, come kiss me," 771. " Muirland Willie," 786. '] Ye banks and braes," 794. " Comin' thro' the rye," 795. " Jenny's bawbee," 795. Scotch manuscripts (Dates of) mistaken—Skene
MSB., 614* and 615. Blaikie's, 772. Sootch tunes in England not before the reign of Charles II., 459, 610. First notices of, 490. Scotch national music first printed in Scotland in the eighteenth century, 490. Necessity of sifting the collections, if to be limited to what Is Scotch, 796. Scott (Sir Walter), 436, 447, 778. Scouring of the White Bone, 729. Secular music in sacred offices.—See Bymns. Sempill (Francis), of Beltrees, Songs erroneously
attributed to, 611, 620, note. Shakespeare.—" Hunt's up," 61. " Good nights," 138, 174. "Cittern head," 101c. Canaries, 368. Recorder, 246. "Broken music," 246c. Fading, 234. Bought his house in Blackfriars from a minstrel, 252. Dr. Wilson, of Oxford, the " Jack Wilson" of his plays, 372. His love of music, 98. Sonnet, 128. On burdens of songs, 222, 223. Songs or tunes alluded to:— " Fortuno, my foe," 162; " When Arthur first," 199; " King Lear and his three daughters," 199; " It was a lover," 205 and 774 ; " O willow, willow," 207 and 774; "Whoop, do me no harm, good man," 208 and 774 ; " O mistress mine," 209 ; " Heart's-ease," 210; " Jog on the foot­path way," 211; " Farewell, dear love," 204" ; " My heart is full of woe," 210, and note; " To shallow rivers," 213; " Three merry men be we," 216; " I loathe that I did love," 216; Gravedigger's song, 200 ; " Peg a Ramsey," 218 ; " Light o' Love," 221 ; Fool's song in Twelfth Night, and in King Lear, 225; " The sick tune," 226; " Good morrow.! 'tis St. Va­lentine's Day," 227 ; " Green sleeves," 227 ; " Come o'er the bourn, Bessy, to me," 505*; " Bonny sweet Robin is all myjoy," 233; " How should I your true love know?" 236 j "And will he not come again?" 237; "Death, rock me asleep," 237; " Thou canst not hit it," 239; " Robin Hood, Scarlet, and John," 393; " King Cophetua," 591; " Oh ! for a husband," 782. Matthew Locke's Music to The Tempest, 479b. Dr. Rimbault's proposed publication of ancient music relating to his plays and poems, 239*.
Shawm (parent of the clarionet), 35b, 246, 768.
Sheale (Richard), the minstrel, 45 to 47, and 198.
Sherwood Forest, 95,117 acres, 780.
Shoemakers (the " gentle craft") all supposed to sing, 98, 277.
Shropshire Rounds, 599.
Sidney (Sir Philip)—Defence of poetry, 46.
" Sing well-a-day," or " Sing well-away," pro­verbial," 175.                                              [99.
Singing, Eight reasons why everyone should learn,
Singing servants recommended by Tusser, 99. Pepys acts upon the advice, 489.
Singing at sight a necessary accomplishment for gentlemen, 99.
Six-men's-songs, 37.
Skelton—To sing " on the booke," 52. " Hankin bovy," 73. " Heve and how, rombelow," 788.
Smith (J. Stafford)—Imperfect barring of old
music, xiv. Attributes " I cannot eat but little
meat" erroneously to Weelkes, 72. Soldiers' songs, 77, 144, 299, 334, 342, 355, 596,
669,708. Rogues'march, 711. Southey on the asserted decay of hospitality, 778. Spanish viols, meaning guitars, 764.             I7"8-
Spencer—Allusions to the hornpipe, 545. Rote, Squire (Chaucer's) makes songs and plays the flute,
33. Stenhouse (W.), Mis-statements and blunders of,
343", 615, 616, and note, 619, 740, 771, &c, &c. Sternhold's Psalms, written for the " laying apart
ungodly songs and ballads," v. Courtiers did not
sing them, " only some few excepted," 54. Stubbes, the Puritan, on May games, 133. Suckling (Sir John), Lampoons upon, 67, 359, and
note. His charming ballad on a wedding, 360. Suffolk harvest customs, 118, 119. Symphony sometimes meaning a tabor or drum,
247c.
Tailors.—Never trust one that does not sing, 99. Tailors' catches, 109.
Tantivy boys and Tantivitiers, 781.
Taunton Dean (Virgins"of), 444.
Tavern music, 480, 481, 488.—See also Fiddlers.
Tetrachords, 13».
Thomson (James)—Rule, Britannia, 687.
Tympanum sometimes signifying a bagpipe, 760b.
Tinkers singing catches, 110. Their 'songs, 187 and 332. Tom Tinker, 353.
Tobacco, Songs on, 563.
Tory (Origin of the word), 427.
Trench (Rev. R. Chevenix, D.D.), 628.
Trenchmore, a Court dance, 82, 769.
Trombone, 35.
Trumpet, 35.
Tumble-down-Dick (The sign of) means Richard Cromwell, 449.
Turner (Sharon) on " The children in the wood,"
Turpin, the higwayman, 661.                       [200.
Tutbury court of minstrels, 37.
[50, 51.
Venetian Ambassadors on the Court of Henry VIII.
Vernon (Admiral), 597, 657.
Vicar of Bray—The story not historical, 787.
Viele and Vielle, 762, 763.—See also Fiddle.
Viols (six strings, tuned by fourths, and with frets). A chest of viols contained four or five of different sizes, 246. Why once preferred, for scholastic music, to violins, 469.—See also Fiddle.
Violin (four strings, tuned by fifths) Origin of, 76 et teq.—See also Fiddle.
Virelay—Chaucer, 36. Gower, 37.
Virginals—time of Henry VII., 35b. Played by both sexes, 100,101. Described, 103. Great number in Charles II.'s time, 486. Virginal jacks, 82, 104. One manuscript of virginal music, con­taining 296 pieces, of various leugths, the first piece with 30 variations, xv.
Wadlow (Simon), 263b and <=, 265. Wait or Waight (the hoboy), 31. Waits originally musica atchmen, 547 and 786.
Afterwards musicians of towns and corporations,
49, 249, 548, 549. Wales (Laws of), as to the harp, 5. Walpole (Horace) on the unpoetical age, 624. On
English country-dances in Italy, 307.







E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III