Popular Music Of The Olden Time Vol 2

Ancient Songs, Ballads, & Dance Tunes, Sheet Music & Lyrics - online book

Home Main Menu Singing & Playing Order & Order Info Support Search Easter Hymns



Share page  Visit Us On FB

Previous Contents Next
818
INDEX OF SUBJECTS.
Gale, Dr.—Song on his flogging the St. Paul's Ixrys,
779. Galliard, a dance, described, 155 and 157. Allu­sions to, 127,147, 242, 62G. Gentle craft (The).—See Shoemakers, Gipsies'songs and dances, 171.                     [484.
Glee, derivation of, 2a. Playford's collections of Gleemen (Anglo-Saxon), 2, 5.                      [470.
Gibbons (Orlando)—Analysis of his " Fancies," Giraldus Cambrensis on music, 18, 19, 20. Gittern (The) Mentioned by Chaucer, 34. Strung
with gut, 35, 102, and 248. " Gitterons which
are called Spanish vialles," 764. Gentlemen expected to play and sing at sight, 99,
100, 489. Reason assigned for the diminished
cultivation of music among, 625. George I.—Anti-Jacobite songs, 436. Gleig (Rev. G. R.)—Note on a march, 519. Goldsmith (Oliver) — Songs mentioned in his
Essays, 772, 779. " Good old cause" (meaning of), 781. Graham (G. F.), 255, 615, 787. Gregorian tones, or scales.—See Church scales. Guido d'Arezzo's improvement in notation, 14. Guitar in fashion in the reign of Charles II., 476.
In Henry the Eighth's time, called the Spanish
Viol, 7G4. Gwynn (Nell), allusions to, 282,325,501,505,785.
Halliwell (J. 0.) on "What if a day," 310.
Halsted (Miss) on Richard III., 200.
Habp.—Root of the word, 6. Handed round at supper by the Anglo-Saxons for each to play and sing, 4. Allusions to the harp in the Anglo-Saxon poem of Beowulf, and the romance of Morn-Child, 6, 20, and 21. Stories of Baldulph entering King Alfred's camp, of Alfred entering the Danish camp, and of Aulaff exploring that of King Athelstan, by means of their harps, 4 and 5. Comparison of man to a well-strung harp, 17. St. Dunstan's enchanted harp, 760. Dancing to the small harp strung with wire, 35. Harps of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, common, double, and triple, and " the incom­parable improvement" of gut strings, 477 and 478. Harp much esteemed in Charles the Second's time, and played by gentlemen, 476, 477. Airs characterized hy, 789.
Harpers.—Played with the nails in early times, 20 and 36. Their dress, 44 and 45. Kings' harpers, 10, 28. Harpers of noblemen, bishops, and abbots, 11 and 29. Great number of harpers at the Coronation of Henry V., 38,—and at the Cour pleniere of Edward I., 29. Blind harpers proverbial in sixteenth centuiy, 108.
Harvest songs and rejoicings, 579, 580, 667, and 745.
Hautboy, or Hoboy.—See Wails.
Hawkins (Sir John)—Describes instruments chiefly from foreign books, 6a and 247b. Conjecture about " Old Simon the King" disproved by dates, 263. " Mad Tom" not by Lawes, 329,330. Tune for Chimes not by Jeffries, 778. His His­tory of Music compared with Burney's, ix.
Hav, or Hey (a dance), 153. 368, and 787. Described, 629. " Hey de gie," 82.         [782.
Hazlitt (W.)—Contribution of a traditional song,
Henry VII.—His numerous payments for music, 48, 49.
Henry VIII.—His skill in music, 50 and 53. Music of his reign, 50 to 56. " King Henry's mirth," or Freemen's songs, 55 and 483. His May-day celebrations, 132. Large number of musical instruments at his death, 247b and c, and 248».
Heralds and minstrels compared, 30.
Herefordshire Morris dance, 130b and 134.
Herrick—Six songs to one tune, 773.              [50.
Hill (Richard)—Songs and carols, fifteenth centuiy,
Hobby-horse dances, 130 and 601.
Hoops for ladies,—when the fashion commenced, 787.
Hornpipes, 544, 545, 585. 595, 626, 740, 741, and 792.
Hospitality,—why decayed, 778.
Household Words, on Tom D'Urfcy, 622.
Howard papers (The), song found among, 201.
Hunter (Rev. Jos.) on Robin Hood, 387. Beverley minstrels, 766.
Hunt's-up (A)—Morning music, 61, 100. The custom continued for the royal family, 251.
Hunting songs, 60, 61, 83, 320, 321, 322, 346.
Hurdy-gurdy not the ancient rote, 768.
Husk (W. H.) on musical festivals, 481.
Hyde Park, 326, 327.
Hymns to secular tbkes.—Early English, 765. " Psalms & songs of Zion to the tunes of a strange " land," 111. Church of England, 748. French, 748. Primitive Methodists', 749. Old Scotch, to English tunes, 62, 141, 148, 193, 373, 768.
Inns or Court. — Dancing compulsory, 328. " Sweet and airy activity of the gentlemen," 423. Dance round the coal fire, 424. The Chancellorship through good dancing, 625. Rhymes and revels of the bar, 329.
Instrumental Music.—The English claim of superiority, 472,—and partial admission of, 631. More cultivated than in Italy, 473. Opinions of Matthew- Locke and Christopher Simpson, 475. Increase of cultivation in James's time, 244. Music in six parts, 244. Eight parts, 471. Lighter kinds, 471. (See also under Virginal Music.) First, second, and third music at the­atres, 631.—See also under Foreigners'' Opinions.
Irish claims contested to " My lodging is on the cold ground," 529. " The buff coat hath no fellow," 343. " The girl I left behind me," 708 and 709. " Cruiskeen lawn," 770. "The pretty girl of Derby," 771,—and " Off she goes," 796.
Irish harp and Irish hards, 789a.
Irish Hay (The), a dance, 84, 218.
Irish tunes,—the three earliest extant, 793.
Jacobites, 524.
Jacobites itunes used by)—" Young Jemmy," 524. "The King shall enjoy his own again," 434. "On vonder high," 681. "Rule, Britannia," 687. ""God save the King," 705. "Green sleeves," 775.
James L, —Fashion for instrumental music in his reign, 244. General state of music, 244 to 254. Court masques, 473, 474. Song on his creating 2000 knights, to raise money, 327. Proclama­tion on lawful recreations, 406. Counterblast to tobacco, 563. Hunting songs, 321.
James II.—" Old Jemmy," 524. " Lilliburlero " (and others to the tune), 568, et seq.







E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III