Popular Music Of The Olden Time Vol 2

Ancient Songs, Ballads, & Dance Tunes, Sheet Music & Lyrics - online book

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816                                                   INDEX OF SUBJECTS.
Burdens of songs, 23, 25. Bourdon, 34, and note b. " Hey, nonny, nonny, Hey, trolly, lolly," &c, 54. Burdens sung in plays, 79, 221, 222, 459.
Burn (J. H.), 263", 516.
Burney (Dr.)—Criticism on his History of Music, vii. to ix. Conjecture as to the " Chanson Roland" disproved, 6. His douhts of Giraldus Cambrensis, 19, 20. On " Sumer is icumen in," 21, 22. On numerous inaccuracies and mis­statements in his History, 245", Wrong account of English opera, 479, and note «, 783. Mistake about the rote, 766. Inaccurate account of the first Italian opera, 473, and note.
Butler (Samuel)—Songs on the Eoundheads, 410 and 447.
Byrde (W.)—Eight reasons why every one should sing, 99.
Cambridge, 50 musicians in the College Chapel, Campion (Dr.), 310, and note.                      [477.
Canaries, dance, 368. Canon in unison, the earliest example, English, 23.
General useof, 108. Contrivances of canon, 484l>. Carey (Henry)—Claim to " God save the King"
considered, 694, 701. His account of " Sally in
our alley," 645. Carolling, merry singing, ix. Carriages introduced in England, 138b. Carters, carmen, and ploughmen, whistling, 53,
138, 579, and 797. Catches, 108, and note. How to make, 484b.
Collections of, 483. Singing catches, 565. Cathedrals.—Misappropriation of musical funds,
402. Puritan abuse of, 405. Characteristic airs of England, 21, 789, 791. Mere
terminations an unsafe guide, 792. Few airs of
melancholy cast, 790. Old ditties generally
cheerful, 791. Manly and jovial airs, 791.
Tunes to lengthy narratives, 791. Hornpipes,
jigs, and bagpipe-tunes, 791. Charles I.—His trial, 164. Love of music, 414.
Private band, 468. Song attributed to, 414.
Of doubtful authenticity, 781. Charles II.—Dancing, 82. Song on his escape from
Worcester, 435. On his restoration, 435, 436.
Music for his entry to London, 479. Coronation,
699. Specimen of his letters, 467. Only liked
dance music, 468, 621. His " four-and-twenty
fiddlers," 468, 469b. Charles at the theatre,
606, 526. Lampoons on, 569». Singing with
D'Urfey, 622. Chaucer's descriptions of music, 32 to 37. " Sing
weylaway," 175. " Sing a quinible," 34d.
" Douced," 36, and note. Chester Fair—Minstrels relieve the castle, 10. Chettle (Henry) on ballad-singers, 106. On
carmen, 138. Ballads named by, 137, 145. Chorus, or Corus, a skin stretched in the curve of
two pipes,—also a crowde or fiddle, 760b, 764. Christmas carols, 41, 42, 48, 64, 111, 151, 194,
197, 232, 234, 279, 319, 373, 541, 750 to 758. Christmas, Lamentation of, 463, 782. Christmas returned, 499. Christmas sports, 64, 70, 195, 548, 601. Church scales, or modes, 12, 13, 790. Sometimes
mistaken for minor scales, 790. The eleventh
mode, or key of C natural, copied from the
" vulgar musicians of towns and villages," 27.
Omission of the major seventh in old tunes ac-
counted for by the Dorian mode, or first Church
scale, 790. Church singers, 18, 51, 403c, Cinque pace, a dance, 156a. Cittern, or Cithren, a kind of guitar strung with
wire, 35, 99, 248. Described, 101, and note d.
" As natural to a barber as milk to a calf," 104.
Sir J. Hawkins's description incorrect, 247b.
Facsimile of cittern music, xxiii. Citole, 35.
Claricorde, 35", 321>. Clarion, 35b. Clavicimbals, 35b. Clavichord, 49. Cleiveland (John)—Songs against Puritans, 420.
His definition of a Protector, 421. Cloth-workers singing catches, 109. Clubs, earliest notice of, 488. Cobblers proverbially singers, and merry, 98, 110,
278, 348, 352, 589.—See also Shoemakers. Cock-fighting, 659. Collier (J. Payne) on the " great variety of entries
about music in household books," 45. Note on
The Sunt is up, 60. On the registers of the .
Stationers' Company, 107, 117. On Roxburghe
Ballads, 263, 297, 776. On Dodsley's Old Plays, Colliers singing musicin parts, 109. [329, 834. " Common tunes," Mace's description oi, 485. Concerts, origin of public, 479 et seq. Corbet (anecdote of Bishop), 501. Cork, ballad on burning of the city, 163. Battle
of birds over, 502.                                    [631.
Cornet, 248, and note. English excelled in playing, Cornwall—Three-men's-songs, 110. Wideslade,
the minstrel, 108. Ballad' of flies at Bodmin, Corser, Rev. Thomas, 784.                           [199.
Counterpoint, definition of, 15. Origin attributed
to England, 21. Of thirteenth century, in six
parts, 23. Country dances at Court, from Elizabeth to
James II., 340, 626. " Transplanted into
almost all the Courts of Europe," 627". Italians
"fond to a degree" of them, 307. Mistakes as
to the origin of, 626 et seg. Names of, derived
from ditties, 424. Round and square country
dances, 627. Sets printed in Paris, 719. In
Germany, Denmark, and the Netherlands, xi.
and 628. Court masques, 473, 474. Music of, reprinted
abroad, 424. Countrymen's songs and sports, 87, 90, 153, 459,
607, 633, 542. Coverdale (Myles) advises courtiers to forsake their
ballads, ploughmen their whistling, and young
women their hey, nonny, nonny, and such fantasies,
v. and 53, 54. Craig's collection of Scotch tunes, 620. Croker (John Wilson), on country dances, 627. Cromwell (Oliver)—Love of music, 415. Songs
against, 416, 440, &c. Psalms to entertain
ambassadors, 450.—See also Old Noll. Cromwell (Thomas) introduces Three-metfs-songs
into Italy, 52. Ballad on his fall, 54.         [vii.
Crotch (Dr.), 7, 28, 529. His Specimens of Musk, Crowde, eruth, or crwth, described, 762.—See also
Fiddle. Crumhorn, Cremorne, or Cremona, 247c. Cupid's, or Cuper's Gardens, opposite Somerset
House, 727. Curtal, a short sackbut or bassoon, 247*,.







E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III