Popular Music Of The Olden Time Vol 2

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REIGN OF CHARLES II.                                               527
The popularity of the song was very great, and may be traced in an uninter­rupted stream from that time to the present. The words were reprinted in Merry Drollery Complete, Part II., 1670, under the title of "Phillis, her Lamentation;" and in the same, a parody on it, called " Women's Delight." Another parody, " My lodging is on the cold boards," is in Howard's play, All Misiaken, 1672. Then the original in The New Academy of Compliments, 1694, 171J5, &c.; in Vocal Music, or the Songster's Companion, 8vo., 1775 ; in Johnson's Lottery Song Book, n.d. ; and fifty others. It was lengthened into a ballad, and became equally popular in that form. A copy is in the Roxburghe Collection, ii. 423, "printed by and for W. 0[nley] for A. Melbourne], and sold by C. Bates, at the Sun and Bible in Pye Corner." Onley and Milbourne were ballad-printers in the reign of Charles II. Bates I believe to be somewhat later. It is as fellows:—
" The slighted Maid; or The pining Lover.
With sighs and moans she doth intreat her dear, Whilst he seems to be deaf and will not hear ; At length his frozen heart begins to melt, Being moved with the passion she had felt.
To the tune of I prithee, Love, turn [to] me," &c. "Licens'd and enter'd according to order."
Was ever maiden so scorned
By one that she loved so dear ? Long time have I sighed and mourned,
And still my love will not hear: 0 turn to me, my own clear heart,
And I prithee, love, turn to me, For thou art the lad I long for,
And, alas 1 what remedy ?
My lodging is on the cold ground,
And very hard is my fare; But that which troubles me most, is
The nnkindness of my dear : 0 turn to me, my own dear heart,
And I prithee, love, turn to me, For thou art the lad I long for,
And, alas! what remedy ?
0 stop not thine ear to the waitings
Of me, a poor harmless maid ; You know we are subject to failings,—
Blind Cupid hath me betrayed : And now I must cry, 0 turn, love,
And I prithee, love, turn to me, For thou art the man that alone art
The cause of my misery.
How canst thou be so hard-hearted,
And cruel to me alone; If ever we should be parted,
Then all my delight is gone : But ever I cry, 0 tnrn, love,
And I prithee, love, turn to me, For thou art the man that alone art
The cause of my misery.
I'll make thee pretty sweet posies,
And constant I ever will prove ; I'll strew thy chamber with roses,
And all to delight my love : Then turn to me, my own dear heart,
And I prithee, love, turn to me, For thou art the man that alone canst
Procure my liberty.
I'll do my endeavour to please thee
By making thy bed full soft; Of all thy sorrows I'll ease thee
By kissing thy lips full oft: Then turn to me, my own dear heart,
And I prithee, love, turn to me, For thou art the man that alone canst
Procure my liberty.







E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III