Popular Music Of The Olden Time Vol 1

Ancient Songs, Ballads, & Dance Tunes, Sheet Music & Lyrics - online book

Home Main Menu Singing & Playing Order & Order Info Support Search Shopping Discounts



Share page  Visit Us On FB

Previous Contents Next
REIGN OF ELIZABETH.
193
PUT ON THY SMOCK ON MONDAY. This is mentioned as a country dance tune in Heywood's A Woman MlVd with Kindness, act i., sc. 2; and alluded to in Fletcher's Love's Cure, act ii., sc. 2. It is contained in the fourth, fifth, and later editions of The Dancing Master.
DRIVE THE COLD WINTER AWAY.
This is the burden of a song in praise of Christmas, copies of which are in the Pepys (i. 186) and Roxburghe (i. 24) Collections. It is entitled " A pleasant countrey new ditty: merrily shewing how to drive the cold winter away. To. the tune of Wfien Phosbus did rest"a &c.; black-letter, printed by H[enry] G[osson], It is one of those parodied in Andro Hart's Compendium of Qodly Songs.                  " The wind blawis cald, furious and bald,-
ThiB lang and mony a day ; But, Christ's mercy, we mon all die,
Or keep the cald wind away. This wind sa keine, that I of meine,
It is the vyce of auld; Our faith is inclusit, and plainely abusit, This wind he's blawin too cald," &c.
Scottish Poems qflGth Century, ii. 177, 8vo., 1801. The tune is in every edition of The Dancing Master; in Musictfs Delight on the Cithren, 1666; and in Walsh's Dancing Master: also in both editions of Pills to purge Melancholy, with an abbreviated copy of the words.
In the Roxburghe Collection, i. 518, is a ballad entitled " Hang pinching; or The good fellow's observation 'mongst a jovial crew, of them that hate flinch≠ing, but are always true blue. To the tune of Drive the cold winter away" commencingó " All you that lay claim to a good fellow's name, And yet do not prove yourselves so, Give ear to this thing, the which I will sing, Wherein I most plainly will shew
* A song beginning " When Phcebus addral his course to the West," will be found in Merry Drollery Complete, Part ii., 1661; also in Wit and Drollery, Jovial Poems. The burden js, *' O do not, do not kill me yet, for I am
not prepared to die." By that name it is quoted in J. Starter's Boertighedcn, quarto, Amsterdam, 1634, where the tune is also printed.