Popular Music Of The Olden Time Vol 1

Ancient Songs, Ballads, & Dance Tunes, Sheet Music & Lyrics - online book

Home Main Menu Singing & Playing Order & Order Info Support Search Shopping Discounts



Share page  Visit Us On FB

Previous Contents Next
REIGN OF ELIZABETH.                                                127
Copies of the ballad will be found in the Koxburghe Collection, vol. ii., 30; and in the Douce Collection, -with the burden or chorus, " Sing, trang, dildo dee," at the end of each verse, which is not given by Percy. The two last bars are here added for the burden. In some copies the four first bars are repeated.
THE FBOG GALLIAED, or NOW, 0 NOW!
This is the only tune, composed by a well-known musician of the age, that I have found employed as a ballad tune.
In Dowland's First Book of Songes, 1597, it is adapted to the words, " Now, 0 now, I needs must part" (to be sung by one voice with the lute, or by four without accompaniment); but in his Lute Manuscripts it is called The Frog Q-aUiard, and seems to have been commonly known by that name.
In Morley's Consort Lessons, 1599 and 1611, it is called The Frog Gfalliard; in Thomas Robinson's New Oitharen Lessons, 1609, The Frog; and in the Skene Manuscript, Froggis Gtahiard.
In Nederlandtsche Q-edench-Clanch, printed at Haerlem in 1626, it is called Nou, nou [for Now, 0 now] ; but all the ballads I have seen, that were written to it, give the name as The Frog Q-alliard.
In Anthony Munda/s Banquet of dainlie Conceits, 1588, there is a song to the tune of BowlanoVs Gralliard, but it could not be sung to this air.
It seems probable that Now, 0 now, was originally a dance tune, and the composer finding that others wrote songs to his galliards, afterwards so adapted it likewise.
The latest Dutch copy that I have observed is in Dr. Camphuysen's Stichlelycke Hymen, printed at Amsterdam in 1647.
Dowland is celebrated in the following sonnet, which, from having appeared in The Passionate Pilgrim, has been attributed to Shakespeare, but was published previously in a Collection of Poems by Richard Barnfield.