THE PLAY-PARTY IN INDIANA - online book

Folk-Songs and Games with Descriptive Introduction, Notes, Sheeet music & Lyrics

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The Play-Party in Indiana.                         45
First young gent lead out to the right, Right hand lady with left hand swing, Partner in center and seven hands ring, Lady swing out and gent swing in, Seven hands up and gone again, Such a getting upstairs, I never did see, Such a getting upstairs, it don't suit me.
Miss Alice Delay, Brown Tp.
First gent swing by the right hand round,
Back by the left and swing clear around.
And swing her to the center and all hands around.
Such a getting upstairs, I never did see,
Such a getting upstairs don't suit me.
The lady swing out, the gent swing in, All hands up and go again. Such a getting upstairs, I never did see, Such a getting upstairs, it don't suit me.
Balance all, swing oh swing,
All hands up and in a ring,
Such a getting upstairs, I never did see.
Such a getting upstairs, it don't suit me.
Miss E. F. Laud, Southern part of county.
b. All have partners and form a circle. One couple enters the center. They join right hands and swing to the left, while singing 1. At 2, the couple join left hands and swing around to the right. At 3, the girl stands still in the center while the boy joins hands with those in the circle, and with them circles to the left while singing 4. At 5, the girl swings out of the center into the circle, and the boy swings into the center. At 6, he joins the circle and all are in their original positions. All join hands above their heads and circle around to the left. At 7, partners swing. At 8, all promenade.
Repeat from the beginning with the next couple at the right and continue repeating until each couple has been in the center. (1. It is interesting to find "Hunt the Squirrel" and "Getting Upstairs" as morris dances in "The Morris Book" of Sharp and Macilwaine (ii, pp. 18-19). We have also the game, "Hunt the Squirrel" (Newell, pp. 168-69), but it has no music. This play-party game, "Getting Upstairs," may be connected with the English dance of that name. The movements are not very different. The unusual complexity of this in comparison with most of the other games also suggests that a relationship exists.
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E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III