THE PLAY-PARTY IN INDIANA - online book

Folk-Songs and Games with Descriptive Introduction, Notes, Sheeet music & Lyrics

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20
The Play-Party in Indiana.
Long-ways Dance.—One in which the first position is as follows: two parallel lines are formed, (usually girls being in one line and boys in the other) and with partners facing. The lines are four steps apart.
To cast off is to turn outwards and proceed without one or other of the lines of the dancers; to cast up or cast down is to dance up or down inside the general set.1
Courtesy.—Step backward on the right foot; bend the right knee, straighten left leg and incline the body slightly forward. At the same time the skirts may be grasped at either side and spread sideways.
Kneel.—Bend the left knee and place the right knee on the floor.
To pass by the right is to pass right shoulder to right shoul­der; by the left, left shoulder to left shoulder.
To lead is to move forward.
To make a half turn is to turn through half a circle and face in the opposite direction.2
To make a whole turn means that the dancer revolves on his right foot as an axis through a complete circle.3
If two players are directed to take or give right or left hands they are to join right with right, or left with left.
In dances or figures in which two couples only are engaged, the terms contrary girl and contrary boy are used to denote the girl or boy other than the partner.4
The normal country dance step is a springy walking step (the ball of the foot taking the ground before the heel), two to each bar/ executed by women with a natural, unaffected grace, and on the part of men with a complacent bearing and certain jauntiness of manner which is very difficult to describe, and which must, per­haps, be seen to be appreciated.5
1.     C. J. Sharp. Country Dance Book, Part I, p. 27.
2.      Ibid. Part II, p. 32.
3.      ibid. Part II, p. 32.
4.      Ibid. Part III, p. 10.
5.     Ibid. Part III. p. 27.
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E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III