The First Principles Of Pianoforte Playing

A complete playing tutorial for self learners or school use.

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SUMMARY OF PART III.                                  93
is nevertheless far more important, since upon it depends the kind and degree of tone, and our agility-possibilities.
32) : There are three ways of forming or constructing the act of Touch from its three muscular-components. These three muscular-combinations are:—(a) First Species of Touch-formation, Finger-exertion only, with passive hand and self-supported arm; (b) Second Species of Touch-formation, Hand and finger exertions, combined with the self-supported arm; (c) Third Species of Touch-formation, Arm-weight employed in conjunction with the exer­tions of the finger and hand.
33): Arm-weight, whenever it is employed,1 must be ob­tained by releasing or relaxing the arm-supporting muscles* The whole arm from the shoulder must thus be relaxed, to the extent required by the key; and we must guard against endeavouring to obtain the required weight from the Fore-arm only.
34): The slight but continuous release of Arm-weight which induces the second (or slightly heavier) form of the Resting— and which forms the basis of all natural Tenuti and Legati, is identical with the act of tone-production at its very softest. To obtain this effect, we must release arm-weight upon the key, until the tatter's resistance is just overcome. The consequent sinking down of the key feels more like a passive process than like an active one.
35): Arm-weight, when applied as an " Added-impetus," must cease to operate against the key the very moment that sound is reached. This cessation must be wrought by accurately timing the hand-and-finger exertions against the key. And it is in response to the consequent disappearance of support at the Wrist that the arm-supporting muscles must be automatically called into action.
36) : Natural Legato arises, when we transfer the second form of the " Resting " from finger to finger.           The result is
ppp, unless we meanwhile add force in some form during key-depression;—i.e. : unless we also employ the Added-impetus in one of its numberless forms.
1 Both in its forms of "Added-impetus" and of " Resting."
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