The Oxford Book of Ballads - online book

A Selection Of The Best English Lyric Ballads Chosen & Edited by Arthur Quiller-Couch

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HUGHIE THE GRAEME
XIII
He looked over his left shoulder, And for to see what he might see ;
There was he aware of his auld father, Came tearing his hair most piteouslie.
XIV
' O hald your tongue, my father,' he says, { And see that ye dinna weep for me!
For they may ravish me o' my life,
But they canna banish me fro' Heaven hie.
xv
' Here, Johnie Armstrang, take thou my sword. That is made o' the metal sae fine ;
And when thou comest to the English side, Remember the death of Hughie the Graeme.'
744, The Lochmaben Harper
I
O HEARD ye na o' the silly blind Harper, How long he lived in Lochmaben town ? And how he wad gang to fair England, To steal King Henry's Wanton Brown ?
11
But first he gaed to his gude wyfe, Wi' a' the haste that he could thole—
' This waik,' quo' he, ' will ne'er gae weel, Without a mare that has a foal.'—
thole] suffer, be capable of.
7'9
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