The Oxford Book of Ballads - online book

A Selection Of The Best English Lyric Ballads Chosen & Edited by Arthur Quiller-Couch

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THE BATTLE OF OTTERBURN
mi They swapp'd together, while that they swet,
With swordes sharp and long; Each on other so fast they bette,
Their helms came in pieces down.
LIV
The Percy was a man of strength,
I tell you in this stounde : He smote the Douglas at the sword's length
That he fell to the grounde.
LV
The Douglas call'd to his little foot-page,
And sayd, ' Run speedilye, And fetch my ain dear sister's son,
Sir Hugh Montgomery.
LVI
' My nephew good,' the Douglas sayd,
' What recks the death of ane ? ' Last night I dream'd a dreary dream,
And I ken the day 's thy ain.
LVII
' My wound is deep : I am fayn to sleep,
Take thou the vaward of me, A^.d hide me by the bracken bush
Grows on yon lilye-lee.'
LVIII
He has lifted up that noble lord
With the saut tears in his e'e ; He has hidden him in the bracken bush
That his merry men might not see.
bette] beat.              stounde] time.
660
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