The Oxford Book of Ballads - online book

A Selection Of The Best English Lyric Ballads Chosen & Edited by Arthur Quiller-Couch

Home Main Menu Singing & Playing Order & Order Info Support Search Shopping Discounts



Share page  Visit Us On FB

Previous Contents Next
CLERK SAUNDERS
XIII
But he lay still, and sleepit sound,
Albeit the sun began to sheen ; She look'd atween her and the wa',
And dull and drowsie were his e'en.
XIV
Then in and came her father dear;
Said, ' Let a' your mourning be ; I'll carry the dead corse to the clay,
And I'll come back and comfort thee.' xv ' Comfort weel your seven sons,
For comforted I will never be: I ween 'twas neither knave nor loon
Was in the bower last night wi me.'
Part II i
The clinking bell gaed through the town,
To carry the dead corse to the clay ; And Clerk Saunders stood at may Margaret's window,
I wot, an hour before the day.
il 'Are ye sleeping, Marg'ret ? ' he says,
' Or are ye waking presentlie ? Give me my faith and troth again,
I wot, true love, I gied to thee.' in ' Your faith and troth ye sail never get,
Nor our true love sail never twin. Until ye come within my bower,
And kiss me cheik and chin.' twin] break in two.
Previous Contents Next