ON THE TRAIL OF NEGRO FOLK-SONGS

A Collection Of Negro Traditional & Folk Songs with Sheet Music Lyrics & Commentaries - online book

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190
NEGRO FOLK-SONGS
YOU CALL ME DOG, I DON* KER
You call me dog,. . I don* ker, Oh, rock-um Jub - a - lee!
You call me dog, I don' ker,
Oh, my Lord! You call me dog, I don* ker,
Oh, rockum jubalee!
You call me cat, I don' ker,
Oh, my Lord! You call me cat, I don' ker,
Oh, rockum jubalee!
You call me mule, I don: ker,
Oh, my Lord! You call me mule, I don' ker,
Oh, rockum jubalee!
You call me snake, I don' ker,
Oh, my Lord! You call me snake, I don' ker,
Oh, rockum jubalee!
This was used to teach very young children to "shout and clap," which was done in syncopated1 time as an accompaniment. The verses were endless, as every known and unknown biological speci­men was introduced.
Mrs. Ratcliffe of Natchez has two felines in a fragment of folk­song she gave me:
Mary, she did dream a dream,
As she was floating down the stream.
When she woke, she gave a sigh,
The grey cat kicked out the black cat's eye!
Birds and fowls also enter into the biological folk-song of the Negro. Feathers, wild and tame alike, flit through the lines, for the Negro makes comrades of the creatures that come into his life. He shows this difference from the sophisticated poet in that he devotes







E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III