ON THE TRAIL OF NEGRO FOLK-SONGS

A Collection Of Negro Traditional & Folk Songs with Sheet Music Lyrics & Commentaries - online book

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SONGS ABOUT ANIMALS
179
Oh, I'm dat chile to fight, I'm dat chile to fight, I'm dat chile to fight, I'm dat chile to fight, An' beat de banjo, too.
I tell de raccoon 'gin to pray,
While on de ground de raccoon lay,
But he jump up an' run away,
An' soon he out ob sight, soon he out ob sight, Soon he out ob sight, soon he out ob sight, Sittin' on a rail.
My ole massa dead an' gone,
A dose o' poison help him on,
De Debil say he funeral song,
Oh, bress him, let him go I bress him, let him go I Bress him, let him got bress him, let him gol An' joy go wid him, too.
De raccoon hunt so very quare, Am no touch to kill de deer, Beca'se you cotch him widout fear,
Sittin' on a rail, sittin' on a rail,
Sittin' on a rail, sittin' on a rail, Sleepin' wery sound.
Ob all de songs I eber sung
De raccoon hunt's de greatest one,
It always pleases old an' young,
An' den dey cry encore, den dey cry encore, An' den dey cry encore, den dey cry encore, An' den I cum agin.
The coon comes in as a table delicacy in a song sent by Mrs. Cammilla Breazeale, from Natchitoches, Louisiana.
My little yaller coon
Done got back here so soon,
Dat I ain't yet got
De big fat coon
For de 'tater an' de pone,
To eat in de light of de moon.
Most of the wild or forest animals that the Negro mentions in folk-songs are those that he encounters here in America, animals native to the South. But sometimes he reverts to ancestral memo­ries, perhaps, or indulges in imaginative excursions where he meets other creatures, not seen in his rounds here. But for the mention of







E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III