ON THE TRAIL OF NEGRO FOLK-SONGS

A Collection Of Negro Traditional & Folk Songs with Sheet Music Lyrics & Commentaries - online book

Home Main Menu Singing & Playing Order & Order Info Support Search Easter Hymns



Share page  Visit Us On FB


Previous Contents Next
LULLABIES
159
Who all de time a-stealin' Of de shovel an' de rake? Mammy's little boy, Mammy's little boy. Who all de time a-ridin'
Of dat great big lazy drake?
Mammy's little baby boy!
Chorus
Who all de time a-runnin' To de kitchen for a bite? Mammy's little boy, Mammy's little boy. Who mess hisself wid 'taters Till his clo'se is jes' a sight?
Mammy's little baby boy.
Chorus
Who all de time a-fussin'
When you go to wash his skin? Mammy's little boy, Mammy's little boy. Who fuss an' cry an' holler
When you take him out de tub, Cause he want to get back in?
Mammy's little baby boy. Chorus
Who all de time a-fussin' Fo' 'lasses on his bread? Mammy's little boy, Mammy's little boy. Who all de time a-fallin' An' bump his little head?
Mammy's little baby boy. Chorus
An examination of these Negro lullabies as a whole shows that the music is simple, with the elemental simplicity that belongs to child­hood. There is a crooning sweetness about them, a tenderness as manifest in the tones as in the words, which one rinds infinitely appealing. One discerns in them something more than ordinary mother-love, — as marvellous as that is, — a racial mother-heart which can take in not only its own babies, but those of another, dominant, race as well. What other nation of mothers has ever patiently and with a beautiful sacrifice put alien children ahead of its own — in outward devotion if not in actual fact? Remembrance of the spirit back of these lullabies gives them a more poignant beauty. Yet even without that, even in themselves, they are lovely enough to deserve the study of musicians and poets. The words are sometimes compounded of that jovial nonsense which charms chil-







E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III