Music Of The Waters - online book

Sailors' Chanties, Songs Of The Sea, Boatmen's, Fishermen's,
Rowing Songs, & Water Legends with lyrics & sheet music

Home Main Menu Singing & Playing Order & Order Info Support Search Voucher Codes



Share page  Visit Us On FB

Previous Contents Next
Music of the Waters.                145
by Monsieur Sebillot. He says it is often repeated, or portions of it, in French novels. The sailors of Groix are considered very good seamen. Groix is an island situated not far from the coast of Morbihan.
The words that follow are those of a French rowing song—" La Chanson des Mariniers," or " The Boatmen's or Watermen's Song." It also hails from Morbihan :—
French Version.
Mon pere a fait batir maison, Tirons done tous sur nos avirons, Tirent, all! tirent, mariniers, tirent, Tirons done tous sur nos avirons.
Par quatre-vingts jolis garcons, Tirons done tous sur nos avirons, Tirent, ah ! tirent, mariniers, tirent, Tirons done tous sur nos avirons.
Le Roy a passe1 aux environs, Tirons done tous sur nos avirons, Tirent, ah ! tirent, mariniers, tirent, Tirons done tous sur nos avirons.
A qui est-ce done cette maison ? Tirons done tous sur nos avirons, Tirent, ah ! tirent, mariniers, tirent, Tirons done tous sur nos avirons.
C'est a ma fille Jeanneton, Tirons done tous sur nos avirons, Tirent, ah ! tirent, mariniers, tirent, Tirons done tous sur nos avirons.
English Version.
My father has had a house built, Pull, then, with all our strength, Pull, ah ! pull, oarsmen, pull, Pull all together with our oars.
By eighty handsome boys, Pull, then, all together with our oars, Pull, ah ! pull, oarsmen, pull, Pull, then, with all our oars. .
The King has passed in the vicinity, Pull, then, all together with our oars, Pull, ah ! pull, oarsmen, pull, Pull, then, all together with our oars.
To whom, then, belongs this house ? Pull, then, with all our oars, Pull, ah ! pull, oarsmen, pull, Pull, then, all together with our oars.
It belongs to my daughter Jeanneton, Pull, then, all together with our oars, Pull, ah ! pull, oarsmen, pull, Pull, then, with all our oars.
The French chanty so popularly known as " Ali! alo ! " originates with the sailors and dock-labourers of the Port of Dunkerque. So much does its rhythm appeal to them that it nearly always serves as the tune for all their " com­plaints." Any day in Dunkerque you may hear this " Ali! alo ! " trolled out by dozens of them as you pass along the quay. Now it comes from the lips of some smart matelot, and the words are as follows :—







E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III