Music Of The Waters - online book

Sailors' Chanties, Songs Of The Sea, Boatmen's, Fishermen's,
Rowing Songs, & Water Legends with lyrics & sheet music

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Music of the Waters.             Ill
" Some good-like body, some bonny body, To be with me at noon ; But last I married a keelman, And my good days are done.
" I thought to marry a parson, To hear me say my prayers— But I have married a keelman, And he kicks me down the stairs.
" I thought to marry a dyer, To dye my apron blue ; But I have married a keelman, And he makes me sairly rue.
" I thought to marry a joiner, To make me chair and stool ; But I have married a keelman, And he's a perfect fool.
" I thought to marry a sailor, To bring me sugar and tea ; But I have married a keelman, And that he lets me see."
Many of the local songs of Northumberland are full of exquisite humour. Here is one well-known to North­umbrians in general and to Northumbrian fishermen and seamen in particular. It was mentioned amongst a few others in an article which I found in a very old volume of Blackwood's Magazine. The verses are given somewhat differently in the book of " Northumbrian Minstrelsy" (published by the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle-upon-Tyne), and the tune that it is set to there is that which is known as " The Wedding o' Blythe; or, Blue's gaen oot o' the Fashion "—
" Blue's gaen oot o' the fashion, Red's come in with the new; But I'll have a sailor laddie, And dye my apron blue."







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