Music Of The Waters - online book

Sailors' Chanties, Songs Of The Sea, Boatmen's, Fishermen's,
Rowing Songs, & Water Legends with lyrics & sheet music

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Music of the Waters.              41
In eighteen hundred and sixty-four As we go marching along.
Chorus.—Glory, halleluiah ! &c.
Solo.—Old John Brown was the Abolition man, Old John Brown was the Abolition man, As we go marching along.
Chorus.—Glory, halleluiah ! &c.
Solo.—John Brown's knapsack was number 92, John Brown's knapsack was number 92, As we go marching along.
Chorus.—Glory, halleluiah ! &c.
" The exploits of the early American Navy," says The New York Tribune, " can be read on the cold pages of history, but nowhere do they live with such freshness and vigour as in the rude naval songs composed at the time when Paul Jones, Decatur, Hull and Pessy filled the annals of the sea' with the splendid tumult of their deeds.' There is one old song called the * Yankee Man-of-war,' descriptive of the cruise of John Paul Jones in the Irish Channel in 1778. The air is peculiarly nautical in its character, and the words are vigorous and full of life. The first and last , stanzas are as follows :—
" 'Tis of the gallant Yankee ship That flew the stripes and stars, And the whistling wind from the west-nor'-west
Blew through the pitch-pine spars. With her starboard tacks about, my boys,
She hung upon the gale ; On an autumn night we raised the light Of the old Head of Kinsale.
*****
' Out booms ! out booms!' our skipper cried, ' Out booms, and give her sheet' And the swiftest keel that ever was launched Shot ahead of the British fleet.







E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III