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TROUBADOURS AND M1NNE-SINGERS. 333
Therefore it seems to me that such a distinction of names ought also to be made amongst the joglars; for it is unjust that the best of them should not be distinguished by name as well as they are by deed. It is unfair that an ignorant man of small learning, who knows a little how to play some instrument, and strums it in public places, for whatever people will give him, or one who sings low ditties to low people about the 6treets and taverns, and takes alms without shame from the first comer, — that all these should indis­criminately go by the name of joglars . . . for joglaria was invented by wise men to give joy to good people by their skill in playing on instru­ments. . . . After that came the troubadours to record valiant deeds, and to praise tl.e good, and encourage them in their noble endeavor. .
. . But in our days, and for some time past, a set of people without sense and wisdom have undertaken to sing and compose stanzas and play on instruments,"* etc.
The poor troubadour desired the king to classify them, and to title the best. The king's answer is extant, wherein he endeavored to do so, but as the real essence and life had departed from the whole institution, it was unavailing.
The troubadours often had poetical combats, when they would indulge in a verse-battle about some " Law of Love," and the judges were selected from the fairest and wittiest of the noble dames. These were called the " Courts of Love."
•Quoted by Ilu^ffer, " Troubabours," p. 72.






E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III