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CHAPTER XXIY.
THE TROUBADOURS AND MINNE-SINGERS.
We now come to an era in music, where the most cultivated miDds gave their attention to the art; and where it is no longer confined to the narrow channels of ecclesiastical, and even heral­dic and martial use, but finds a broader outlet in the subjects of Love, and Nature. The trouba­dours were gentlemen (often knights), who held themselves totally distinct from those musicians who wrote for pay. The rise of chivalry in the middle ages, elevated woman from an unjustly low position, to an absurdly high one. She was held to be the arbiter of Fate; the Queen to whom all service was due; and was almost religiously worshipped. From this exaggerated devotion arose the school of troubadour and minne-singer composition. "When knights racked their brains, as to what new offering they could bring to their lady, it was but natural that they should find, in the combination of poetry and song, a series of never-ending tributes with which they could pay homage to their chosen one.
It is easy to imagine that once launched into






E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III