THE MORRIS BOOK, Online Version

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MUSIC.
MOVEMENTS.
FORMATION.
BLUE-EYED STRANGER (HANDKERCHIEF DANCE).
Once to yourself.
Ju. last half-bar.
Column.
Down-and-back, Ju.
A1.
Up-and-back, j. (forming Fr.)
" Col. to Fr.
B1. All dance at 4/3 step, mark time; swinging hands back and forth Bars 1 to 8. together in time. Bars 7 and 8 to be danced in 4/2 step.
Front.
B1.
Bars 9 to 16.
Chain.
Column.
A2.
As previously in B1, bars 1 to 8.
Front.
B2.
Bars 1 to 8.
Cross-over.
"
B2.
Bars 9 to 16.
As previously in B1, bars 1 to 8.
"
A1.
(2nd time).
Back-to-back.
"
B1.
Bars 1 to 8. (2nd time).
As previously in B1, bars 1 to 8, until bar 7, when leader call "All in." All then draw into Ring in centre, throw up hands on half-bar of bar 8, and Call. (To extend this dance to full length of music, (see p. 50)
"
Fr. to Ring.
Ring.
ALL IN.
MORRIS OFF.
This, as the name denotes, is the tune to which the dancers step as they leave the scene—be it stage, or high road, or village green—of their performance. Its execution is very simple, and there is no limit to the number of times the eight-bar measure may be played—or rather, the limit is set according to the fancy of the leader, for he may, if he pleases, and if the audience manifests no impatience, lead his side back and forth in a serpentine track, round and round for ever so long, till finally they wind from the scene.
The step is the 4/3 step throughout, but with a difference. It is more of a plod, with less of stamping and much less lifting of the feet. Morris Off, danced in the traditional manner, gives one the impression of a company agreeably tired, but pleased and comfortable, having rollicked to their hearts' content, and to the contentment of the lookers-on; and being now upon the way to supper, and to bed. Of course, if they be still exuberant, they may show it, and stamp their lustiest; still a demurer step will usually suggest itself as the more appropriate. This quieter manner is best described as almost a slow, very gentle trot, the steps little longer than the foot— left, right, left; and then, on the fourth beat, not a hop, but a tap with the heel.
As for the movements. After "Once to yourself," the side marks time for 6 bars, and makes a complete right turn, slowly, in bars 7 and 8; then the leader, with Nos. 3 and 5 behind him, starts






E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III