Ballads & Songs of Southern Michigan-songbook

A Collection of 200+ traditional songs & variations with commentaries including Lyrics & Sheet music

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War
239
95 THE TEXAS RANGERS
For a discussion of this broadside song, which is surely an echo of the great fight at the Alamo on March 6, 1835, and which is modeled on the Bntish ballad, "Nancy of Yarmouth," see Belden, JAFL, XXV, 14-15. For references and texts see Cox, p. 262; Tolman and Eddy, JAFL, XXXV, 417-418; and G. F. Will, "Four Cowboy Songs," JAFL, XXVI, 186. See also Carter, JAFL, XLVI, 48; Eddy, No. 116; Fuson, pp. 191-192; Henry, JAFL, XLIV, 85--7; Pound, No. 73; Sharp, II, 253; and Stout, p. 106.
Version A was sung in 1931 by Mr. Walter Reeves, Belding, who learned the song in a lumber camp near Belding during the seventies or eighties.
A
1    Come all you Texas Rangers, wherever you may be, Come listen to a story which happened unto me.
My name 'tis nothing extra, so it I will not tell;
It's about the roving rangers; I'm sure I wish them well.
2    I was scarcely sixteen years of age when I joined that jolly band; We marched from San Antonio unto the Rio Grande.
Our captain there informed us, perhaps he thought it right, "Before you reach the station," says he, "boys, you'll have to fight."
3    We saw the Indians coming; I heard them raise a yell; My feelings at that moment no mortal tongue can tell.
We saw their glittering lances, our captain gave command, "To arms! to arms!" he shouted, "and by your horses stand!"
4    We fought there full nine hours before the work was done; We fought there full nine hours, 'twas near the set of sun. And five hundred as bold rangers as ever saw the West
Lie buried beside their comrades; sweet peace be to their rest.
5    Perhaps you have a mother, likewise a sister, too;
Perhaps you have some sweetheart to weep and mourn for you. If this be your condition and you are bound to roam, I tell you by experience, you'd better stay at home.







E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III