Ballads and Songs of Indiana - online book

A collection of 100 traditional folk songs with commentaries, historical info, lyrics & sheet music

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266 Indiana University Publications, Folklore Series
5.     I worked for that big loafer, Jess Herald was his name, He stood 6-7 in his boots and as slim as any crane;
And his hair hung down like rat tails on his long and lantern
jaw; He was a photograph of all the gents that I saw in Arkansaw.
6.     He fed me on corn dodger that was hard as any rock
Till my teeth began to loosen and my knees began to knock, And I got so thin on sassafras tea I could hide behind a
straw; You bet I was a different lad when I left old Arkansaw!
7.     The day I left old Arkansaw (I dread the memory still!)
I shook both boots from off my feet with an everlasting chill, And I staggered into his saloon and called for wThiskey rawr; I got as drunk as a son-of-a-gun when I left old Arkansaw.
8.     His wife came into the room, she was just sweet sixteen; Her cheeks were red as any rose, she was fair as any queen. And she put her arms around my neck and kissed me on the
jawT, Saying, "Bill, 0 do remember me when you leave old Ark­ansaw !"
9.     So it's fare-you-well, old Arkansaw, the canebrakes and the
chills; It's fare-you-well, old sassafras tea and old corn dodger pills, For if ever I see that land again, I extend to you my paw, It'll be by means of a telescope from here to Arkansaw!
B
"The Arkansaw Traveller." Contributed by Dr. Claude Lomax, of Dale, Indiana. Spencer County. Obtained by him from Mr. Jeremiah Jillett. June 29, 1935.
1. My name it is Bill Stillions; I was born in Buffalo town; For nine long years or more I've roamed this wide world
round. I've had many ups and downs, boys, since the day I left my
ma, But I never knew what misery was till I struck Arkansaw.








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