Ballads and Songs of Indiana - online book

A collection of 100 traditional folk songs with commentaries, historical info, lyrics & sheet music

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170 Indiana University Publications, Folklore Series
28 THE DROWSY SLEEPER
Six variants of this song have been recovered in Indiana, under the following titles: "The Drowsy Sleeper," "Mollie," and "Serenade."
For American texts, see Belden, Herrig's Archiv, CXIX, 430; Campbell and Sharp, No. 47; Cox, p. 348; Greenleaf and Mansfield, p. 151; Hudson, Folksongs, p. 161; Journal, XX, 260; XXIX, 200; XXX, 338 (contains an Indiana text); XXXV, 356; XLV, 55 (one stanza); Pound, p. 51; Scar­borough, Song Catcher, p. 139; Sharp, Folk-Songs of English Origin . . ., 2d series, p. 48; Sturgis and Hughes, p. 30; Henry, Folk-Songs from the Southern Highlands, p. 190 (fragment).
British: JFSS, I, 269; II, 56.
See also BaskervilPs study, "English Songs on the Night Visit," in PMLA, XXXVI, 565-614.
A
"Mollie." Contributed by Mrs. Oda Dealing, of Oakland City, Indiana. Gibson County. June 6, 1935.
1.   "Who comes here to my bedroom window?
Who comes here disturbing me?" " 'T is I, 't is I, your own true lover; 'T is the last time I'll bother thee.
2.   "O Mollie, dear, go ask your mother;
Go ask her if you my bride shall be. If she says 'no/ come back and tell me; T is the last time I'll bother thee."
3.   "I say I won't go ask my mother,
For she's on her bed of rest, And in her hands she holds her Bible, Proving that she is in distress."
4.   "O Mollie, dear, go ask your father;
Ask him if you my bride shall be. If he says 'no/ come back and tell me; 'T is the last time I'll bother thee."
5.   "I say I won't go ask my father,
For he's on his chair for rest, And in his hands he holds a weapon To slay the one that I love best."








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