Ballads and Songs of Indiana - online book

A collection of 100 traditional folk songs with commentaries, historical info, lyrics & sheet music

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Brewster: Ballads and Songs of Indiana           147
4.     She hadn't been on sea more than two weeks,
I'm sure it wasn't three, Till this fair damsel began to weep, And she wept most bitterly.
5.   "Do you weep for your house carpenter,
Or do you weep for fear, Or do you weep for your silver and gold
That you left when you followed me here?"
6.   "Neither do I weep for my house carpenter,
Neither do I weep for fear, But I do weep for my sweet little babe That I left when I followed you here."
7.     She hadn't been on sea more than three weeks,
I'm sure it wasn't four, Till under the deck (there) sprung a leak, And this fair damsel was heard no more.
8.     0 cursed be all seamen,
0 cursed be their lives! For they have learned (?) the house carpenter And stole away his wife.
I
"The House Carpenter." Contributed by Mrs. Mary J. Shriver, of East St. Louis, Illinois. January 24, 1936.
1.     She picked up her dear little babe
And gave it kisses three; "Stay at home for your father's company While I do sail on the sea."
2.     They had not sailed more than two weeks,
I'm sure it was not three, Until this damsel began to weep, And she wept most bitterly.








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