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INDIAN GAMES AND DANCES
I PU-IN
Introductory Note. — This was a favorite game among the natives of the Northeastern States; its "strange whimsies" were first mentioned by William Wood in his book, "New England Prospect," published in London, 1634. It is probable that some form of this game still persists among the scattered descendants of those nearly extinct tribes, but it is not likely that at the present day the victor would proclaim his prowess, as was formerly done, by wearing in the holes of his ears the counters that marked the number of his successful guesses.
Properties. — A number of wheat or other straws cut about a foot long; a mat or blanket; a pointed staff for the Leader.
Directions. — Ten straws must be laid aside as coun­ters for each player. The rest of the straws are sepa­rated into tens and each ten tied with a wisp, making a bundle; one bundle must have eleven straws. There should be as many bundles as players. The bundles must all be tied alike. The game consists in guessing which bundle has the eleven straws. The number of guesses allowed in a game must be fixed upon before starting to play.
All the bundles are thrown in a heap upon the center of the mat. The Leader, who is generally chosen by lot, leads the players to the mat containing the bundles. Each player holds in his left hand his ten counters and follows the Leader with his staff as he moves around the
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E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III