Harmony Book For Beginners - online book

Scales, Intervals, Common Chords, Dominant Seventh Chord and Melody Making.

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134
OREM'S HARMONY BOOK
CHAPTER XXIX
FURTHER USES OF THE DOMINANT SEVENTH CHORD SEQUENCES
The Dominant Seventh Chord is sometimes used with its Fifth omitted, and with its Root Doubled. Occasionally this is both effective and convenient. When the Chord is used in this manner, the Root, if in the Bass, moves up a Fourth or down a Fifth. In any of the upper parts it is carried over.
Here are some examples:
The Dominant Seventh Chord, Fifth omitted, Root Doubled.
Let the student write out the foregoing example in each of the Scales specified below. Make an ear test of it also.
The Dominant Seventh Chord may be used in the foregoing manner whenever desired.
Although the Progression from the Dominant Seventh Chord to the Tonic Chord is the most usual one, there are a number of other Progressions of the Dominant Seventh Chord to be found. The majority of these need not be considered in this book; but there is one useful Progression which should be taken up at this time.
The Dominant Seventh Chord may be followed by the Submediant Chord. In making this Progression the Root of either Chord should be found in the Bass. The various Members move, as follows: the Seventh descends; the Fifth descends; the Third ascends; the Root ascends (one Degree). Here is the way it is done:








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