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CADENCES
CHAPTER XVII
CADENCES
The word Cadence (Latin: cadere, to fall), as used in the art of music, refers to the form of ending of any musical thought. The word Cadence referred originally to the fall of the voice, in spoken language.
The more important musical Cadences are as follows:
Perfect Cadence. The Dominant Chord followed by the Tonic Chord, both chords having their Roots in the Bass, with the final chord in the Root or Octave Position.
Imperfect Cadence. The Dominant Chord followed by the Tonic Chord, but with either Chord inverted, or with the final chord not in the Octave Position.
Plagal Cadence. The Sub-Dominant Chord followed by the Tonic Chord (Roots in Bass). An old Church Cadence.
Example:
Scale of C. Plagal Cadence.








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