Folk Songs from the Southern Highlands - online songbook

Southern Appalachians songs with lyrics, commentary & some sheet music.

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The Mermaid
10. "Oh, no, I will neither take you on board, Oh, no, 1 will neither be as good as my word, For I'm sailing on the lone and lonesome low, For I'm sailing on the lonesome sea."
ii. "If it wasn't for my love for your daughter and your men, I would do unto you as I did unto them, I would sink you in the lone and lonesome low, I would sink you in the lonesome sea."
12. He turned upon his back and down sank he: "Farewell, farewell, to the Merry Golden Tree, For I'm sinking in the lone and lonesome low, For I'm sinking in the lonesome sea."
28 THE MERMAID
(Child, No. 289)
Barry-Eckstorm-Smyth (p. 368) remark: "No ballad has less interest to the student than this." For the great popularity of the ballad in song books ind for many references to these and to traditional texts, see Cox, No. 33; Davis, No. 48. Cf. also PTFLS, No. 10, pp. 162163.
Recorded by Mrs. Henry from the singing of Mrs. Samuel Harmon, Cade's Cove, Blount County, Tennessee, August, 1930.
1. Last Friday night, as we set sail, Not being far from land,
I spied a little sea miss
With a comb and glass in her hand, hand, hand;
With a comb and glass in her hand.
2. Up spoke the captain of a very gallant ship, And a well-spoken man was he:
"I have a wife in Ireland;
This night a widow she will be, be, be;
This night a widow she will be."
3.  Up spoke a young man of a very gallant ship, And a well-spoken man was he:
"I have a sweetheart in that town;
This night she's a-looking for me, me, me;
This night she's a-looking for me."
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E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III