Folk Songs from the Southern Highlands - online songbook

Southern Appalachians songs with lyrics, commentary & some sheet music.

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Lord Thomas and Fair Annet
16.  "What's the matter, what's the matter," Lord Thomas "You look so wonderfulest pale ?                        [says, You use to look as red as a rose;
But now your color doth fail, But now your color doth fail."
17. "Are you blind, are you blind, Lord Thomas," she says, "Or can't you very well see ?
Or don't you see my own heart's blood Come trickerling down my knee, Come trickerling down my knee ?"
18. "1 am not blind," Lord Thomas, he says, "And I can very well see.
And now I see your own heart's blood Come trickerling down thy knee, Come trickerling down thy knee."
19. Lord Thomas had a two-edged sword; Was brazed in metal so free.
He tuk and cut off the brown girl's head And stove it against a tree, And stove it against a tree.
20. "Go, dig a grave," Lord Thomas, he says, "And dig it both wide and deep,
And lay fair Ellender in my arms, And the brown girl at my feet, And the brown girl at my feet."
21. He turned the point of the sword against his heart, The butt against the wall;
And these are the last words Lord Thomas did say Before his dead body did fall, Before his dead body did fall.
B
"Lord Thomas." The song was recorded by D. G. Tiller, a student in Lincoln Memorial University, from the singing of Nathan Beverley, Freeling, Virginia.
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E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III