Folk and Traditional Song Lyrics:
Mulberry Bush

Home Main Menu Folk Song Lyrics A B1 B2 B3 B4 C1 C2 C3
D1 D2 E F G H I J K L1 L2 M N O P Q R S1 S2 S3 S4 T U V W1 W2 XYZ Search Voucher Codes



Share page  Visit Us On FB


Mulberry Bush

Mulberry Bush

     1.
     Here we go round the mulberry bush,
       The mulberry bush, the mulberry bush;
     Here we go round the mulberry bush,
       And round the merry-ma-tanzie.

     This is the way the ladies walk,
       The ladies walk, the ladies walk;
     This is the way the ladies walk,
       And round the merry-ma-tanzie.

     2.
     She synes the dishes three times a-day,
       Three times a-day, three times a-day;
     She synes the dishes three times a-day,
       Come alang wi' the merry-ma-tanzie.

     She bakes the scones three times a-day,
       Three times a-day, three times a-day;
     She bakes the scones three times a-day,
       Come alang wi' the merry-ma-tanzie.
     She ranges the stules three times a-day,
       Three times a-day, three times a-day;
     She ranges the stules three times a-day,
       Come alang wi' the merry-ma-tanzie.
     ________________________________________________________

     (1) Chambers (1847), 270, (1870), 134, a variant, in a
     way, of "Merry-ma-Tanzie", q.v.; "only a kind of dance,
     in which the girls first join hands in a circle, and
     sing while moving around, to the tune of Nancy Dawson
     [the first stanza above].  Stopping short, with a
     curtsey at the conclusion, and disjoining hands, they
     then begin, with skirts held daintily up behind, to walk
     singly along, singing (the 2nd stanza).
     At the last line they reunite, and again wheel round in
     a ring, singing [the first stanza; then imitate the walk
     of gentlemen, with a long stride; then the chorus again.
     After this, "This is the way they wash the clothes,"
     etc., and the chorus.]. They then represent ironing
     clothes, baking bread, washing the house, and a number
     of other familiar proceedings."
     (2) Ibid. (1847), p. 271; (1870), 135; "a fragment of
     this little ballet, as practised at Kilbarchan, in
     Renfrewshire".
     See Opies, Singing Game (1985), 286-92.

MS
oct97
Download the song in PDF format for printout etc. Download the song in RTF format for editing etc.