Folk and Traditional Song Lyrics:
Blaeberry Courtship

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The Blaeberry Courtship

The Blaeberry Courtship

In the Highlands of Scotland there lived a young man,
He was well situated with houses and lands;
He's away to the Highlands to look for a bride,
And he's dressed himself up in a braw suit of Clyde.

"Will ye gang to the Highlands, bonny lassie, with me?
Will ye gang to the Highlands, bonny lassie?" said he.
"It's good for your health, love, to breathe the fresh air,
And go gathering blueberries on our wild mountain plains."

"I'Il nae gang to the Highlands, bonny laddie," said she,
"I'Il nae gang to the Highlands, bonny laddie, with you;
I would rather stop home in those low cornfields,
Nor go gathering blueberries on your wild mountain plains."

Then down came her father, a saucy old man:
" Couldn't you get a mistress in all your Highlands?
It's a poor invitation for Lowlander dame
To go gathering blueberries on your wild mountain plains."

Then up spake the young man and said,
"If you be a farmer, as farmer you are,
"Some of your spare pennies with her you must share,
 Or you'll ne'er see your daughter gang o'er the hill there."

"Gang awa wi' your tartan plaid ower yon hill
One sight of my daughter will do you no ill;
You'll not get my daughter nor spare pennies three.
I will wed her to whom I like. What's that to thee?"

Then down came her mother her child to advise,
Saying, "If you do take him I'm sure you're not wise.
He's a poor naked fellow, as bare as a crow;
He has fled from his country, and that you'll soon know."

But this lassie gang awa to a place she ne'er knew,
From her dadda and mamma now she's gang awa.
And he had no steed for to carry her on,
Saying, "Gang on, bonny lassie, to sweet Milltown."

It's they gang along till they came to a glen.
This lassie being weary she sat herself down,
Saying, "If it was not for your sweet company,
I would lie in these deserts until break of day."

"Rise up, bonny lassie, the sun's gangin' down.
Gang on, bonny lassie, unto sweet Milltown;
It's there we'll get lodgings for you and me."
And she wished for a barn or a byre to lay in.

It's they gang along till they came to Milltown,
Where drovers were driving their drove after drove.
This young man stood viewing his flocks passing by,
Saying, "Gang on, bonny lassie, to sweet Milltown."

It's they gang along till they came to Milltown,
Where two pretty maidens were miiking their cows,
Saying, "You're welcome home, master, with your Lowland dame,
For it's long we've been waiting for your coming hame."

Now this lassie is home to her place of abode,
And she is much weary of her lonesome road.
With rum, gin, and brandy they drunk their health round,
And they made for this lassie a braw bed of downs.

'Twas early next morning he led her to the high;
He bade her look round her as far as she could see:
"This is my lands and possessions, my debts they're all paid,
And you would not ride round them on a long summer's day."

From Ballads and Sea Songs from Nova Scotia, Mackenzie
Collected from Alexander Sutherland
DT #450
Laws N19
RG
oct96
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