Favorite Songs and Hymns For School and Home, page: 0338

450 Of The World's Best Songs And Hymns, With Lyrics & Sheet music for voice & piano.

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Religion is reproached with not being progressive; it makes amends by being imperishable. The endur­ing element in our humanity is not in the doctrines which we concisely elaborate, but in the faiths which unconsciously dispose of us, and never slumber but to wake again. What treatise on sin, what philosophy of retribution, isas fresh as the fifty-first Psalm ? What scientific theory has lasted like the Lord's Prayer ? It is an evidence of movement that in a library no books become sooner obsolete tnan books of science. It is
no less a mark of stability that poetry and religion* literature survive, and even ultimate philosophies seldom die but to rise again. These, and with them the kindred services of devotion, are the expressions of aspirations and faiths which forever cry out for in­terpreters and guides. And in proportion as you car­ry your appeal to those deepest seats of our nature, you not only reach the firmest ground, but touch ac­cordant notes in every human heart, so that, inevitably, the response turns out a harmony.—Dr.Martineau.
TOUCH NOT THE CUP.
T. H. Bayly. Jambs H. Aikman.
I feel sore at heart now. One of the noblest na­tures that used to sit in these seats, one I loved and who loved me; whose hand was as large in its gener­osity as a prairie; who had all the prospects of a noble and useful life, who cc> Id restrain himself and stop when he'd a mind to. But he has gone down to such a degree in intemperance that his friends have given him up in despair. How many of that kind have I seen; and the time as it passed did not suffice for him, or for them. They say: " To be sure I smoke; but
only seven to ten cigars a day; but it is not a necessity for me—I can give it up." Or, *' I know I dnnk a little; but it is not a necessity for me; I can give it up to-day." But they don't; and they don't next year, or the year after; and when they hear the roar of the tide of perdition, over the verge of which they will plunge finally, they can't. The time when men ought to stop is when they first see the peril; when there is time enough for judgment, enough to bring the higher qualities of the mind to sit in judgment over the lower.—Beecker^
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