Favorite Songs and Hymns For School and Home, page: 0270

450 Of The World's Best Songs And Hymns, With Lyrics & Sheet music for voice & piano.

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270
Early Impressions.—Much stress should be laid upon the fact that the youthful memory, being ex­ceedingly tenacious, impressions made upon the child (ore likely to be indelible. The great incidents in the history of the Israelites were woven into song, and these eucharistic epics were required to be dili­gently taught to their children. So, in the present day, the simple doctrines and thrilling events of Christianity should be wrought into verse and im­pressed upon the mind of the teacher by the power of music. Truths thus inculcated will cling to the svd forever. We all know that cherished memories
of home and friends are ours with such enduring: vividness that the record can never be effaced. But in all the reminiscences of days gone by there is-nothing that so haunts the spirit as the songs to which we were accustomed in childhood. The sweet tones of a mother's voice will live and speak in the heart long after the voice has been hushed to silence. The recollection of the hymns which were first heard amid the throng of worshipers in the city, or in the embowered country church, will remain in morning freshness long after the sanctuary has mouldered into-ruins. We may cross oceans, and wander in foreign.
FOLLOW ME, FULL OF GLEE.
Movement Song.
tiimes; the erect frame may be bowed with the •weight of years, and raven ringlets may be changed to locks of snowy whiteness; but the old home-songs heard in the distance in the still morning, or sung by ourselves in some calm hour of reflection, or by the home-circle on a winter's evening, will bring around us the friends and the scenes of other days and of far-off lands; and while the dim eye of age sparkles with unwonted brilliancy, the heart will beat with the buoyancy of early youth. It is not •t all improbable that the songs learned in the nur-
sery, or around the fireside, will be used by the Holy-Spirit in after years as the means of conversion to a better life, it may be, to our final salvation from end­less ruin. On the contrary, bacchanalian or ribald songs, which are apt to be learned and used by those who are unaccustomed to religious melodies, are, in the hands of the Destroyer, a potent means of ruin. ShalL we quietly allow this tremendous power to pass into-the hands of the enemy, or shall we not eagerly seize; upon it as our lawful right, and wield it for the good of our race and the glory of our God?—Service of Song.
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