Favorite Songs and Hymns For School and Home, page: 0034

450 Of The World's Best Songs And Hymns, With Lyrics & Sheet music for voice & piano.

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FAVORITE SONGS FOR SCHOOL AND HOME.
Music IN SCHOOLS.—Controversy in reference to the introduction of the study of music in public schopls is not uncommon. Those who oppose, hold that music is a specialty, that there is no general necessity for its culture, because its use is only for the few. A little observation will show the opposite of this to be the truth. What, indeed, is more common than music? It follows us from the cradle to the grave. The infant is cradled with a lullaby. Every
ingleside blossoms with song. Every service of the sanctuary is strengthened by it. Every emotion ot our human nature utters itself through it. Every convention is enlivened by it. Almost every town has its band, and every hamlet its instrument, and every hedge and grove their warblers. It is com­mon almost as the air we breathe. The very fact of its use makes it useful, and shows its need. But it is said, How can a science so difficult and so hard
SWEET AND LOW.
Larghetto.
J. Barnby. Alfred Tennyson.
to master, be introduced into our common schools ? No one expects the science to be mastered in the common schools. We have grammar; but who sup­poses that the common schools will exhaust the study, and send out accomplished philologists? We have reading and writing; but who supposes that the common schools are to turn out finished scholars in belles-lettres ? What is desired is simply this,—that the presence and power of music shall be felt in the,
common schools. That the children shall be able tu sing. That the teachers shall so far master the fun­damental principles of the science, as to be able to guide the children in the culture of this department of art. The mother needs it in the family. Our manhood needs its refining and hallowing power, Our churches demand it. Our very nature by divine providence craves it, and no primary or secondary in­struction can be complete without it.—E. E. Hizbee*
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