Familiar Songs - Their Authors & Histories

300 traditional songs, inc sheet music with full piano accompaniment & lyrics.

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THE BUSH ABOON TBAQUAIE.
327
Yet now she scornful flies the plain,
The fields we then frequented; If e'er we meet she shows disdain,
She looks as ne'er acquainted. The bonnie bush bloomed fair in May,
Its sweets I'll aye remember; But now her frowns make it decay,
It fades as in December.
I           I
Ye rural powers, who hear my strains,
Why thus should Peggy grieve me ? Oh ! make her partner in my pains,
Then let her smiles relieve me. If not, my love will turn despair,
My passion no more tender; I'll leave the bush aboon Traquair,
To lonely wilds I'll wander.
BARBARA ALLAN.
This famous ballad is very old, and is of Scottish origin. The peasantry of a part of Scotland still sing more stanzas than have ever been in print. The English, or an EngUsh version of it, is called "Barbara Allan's Cruelty; or the Young Man's Tragedy." "Scarlet Town" is given as the home of Barbara, and plebeian Jemmy Grove is substituted for Sir John Graham. I give both versions, as the English one is a curious example of how








E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III